Wednesday, July 23, 2014

MORNING BRIEFING: Plane crash in Taiwan, taxi fee relief and the new South Hill Target

Posted By on Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:56 AM

AROUND HERE

Federal aid has been available to the scorched areas of central Washington, and now President Obama has authorized FEMA to oversee relief efforts. (KHQ)

The Spokane City Council may temporarily suspend fees for taxi drivers after drivers complained that ride-share services like Uber and Lyft don't have to pay the same fees. They'll also look at overhauling the city's taxi rules. (SR)

The Bonner County Sheriff's Department is looking for tips on a boat hit-and-run on Lake Pend Oreille last week. (CdA Press)

Washington Trust has purchased the Ridpath Annex to convert it into office space. (SR)

The South Hill Target is now open. (KXLY)

ELSEWHERE

A plane crash in Taiwan has killed at least 40 people. (BBC)

Ukraine says Russia has shot down two of its fighter jets. (ABC)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo established a commission last year to root out corruption in local politics. Then, when it started to investigate a firm he'd worked with, a senior Cuomo aid told investigators to "pull it back." And that's only the beginning. (NYT)

Some are accusing U.S.-supported militias in Afghanistan of human rights abuses. (Al Jazeera)

D.C. police are crafting risky sting operations to catch people they think might be criminals, prompting accusations that they're luring people into crimes they wouldn't otherwise commit. (WaPo)

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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

EVENTS: Summer outdoor movie and concert series

Posted By on Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 2:39 PM


Sorry to be a downer, but summer is already more than halfway over, which may be news to those who haven't bothered to keep track. There are less than six short weeks from now until Labor Day weekend, the unofficial end of the season. What have you done so far to enjoy the warm weather, outdoors and summer living in the Inland Northwest? Don't forget that our big Summer Guide issue has lots of suggestions for exploring the outdoors, arts, music, theater and food scenes, as well as lots of events for families to enjoy.

Yet if you've been too busy to flip through the Inlander's online or weekly print edition of the community events calendar, there's a chance you've missed listings for the many local, outdoor concert and film series (most listed here are free). There's no better time to enjoy what's otherwise an indoor activity — here's a round-up of what we know of happening around the region.

MUSIC

Manito Park Bench Cafe | The quaint, seasonal cafe hosts free, live music every Friday night, from 6-8 pm, through Aug. 22. It's all ages but those of age can enjoy a beer/wine garden serving No-Li brews. 

Riverfront Park Fountain Cafe | The park's newest food stop hosts free, live music every Wednesday night, from 6-8 pm, through Aug. 20. 

Sandpoint Summer Sounds | The Park Place stage in downtown Sandpoint hosts free, live music for the annual Summer Sounds concert series on Saturdays, from 4-6 pm, through Aug. 30. 

Rock the Nest | The return of Kendall Yards' outdoor, summer concert series on Wednesday nights is set for July 30, at 7 pm, and live local bands perform weekly through Aug. 20. 

Browne's Addition Summer Concerts | This annual outdoor series is on Thursday nights, from 6-8 pm, through Aug. 28, at the Coeur d'Alene Park gazebo.

Community members gather to enjoy live music for the Riverstone Park summer concert series. - CDA ARTS & CULTURE ALLIANCE
  • CdA Arts & Culture Alliance
  • Community members gather to enjoy live music for the Riverstone Park summer concert series.

Summer Concerts at Riverstone | The Coeur d'Alene Arts & Culture Alliance host a free, Thursday night concert series in Riverstone Park, from 6:30-8 pm, through Aug. 28. 

Performers on the Patio | Enjoy live music and the scenic vistas of Arbor Crest Winery's Cliff House Estate grounds, during two ongoing, summer concert series. Thursday's Performers on the Patio concerts, from 5:30-7:30 pm, offer free admission, and run weekly through Sept. 25. Saturday's Concerts on the Cliff series are $8/person, with music from 5:30 pm to dusk, through Sept. 28. Remember, because it's at a winery, these shows are only open to ages 21 and up. 

Outdoor music this summer isn't limited to these series. There's also concerts at the Gorge Amphitheater, the upcoming Festival at SandpointNorthern Quest's outdoor summer concerts, the Spokane Symphony's special summer concerts, Schweitzer's Fall Fest during Labor Day weekend and several other local festivals. For the most updated info, make sure to keep up with the Inlander's weekly print and online music listings.

FILM

Spokane Valley Summer Movies in the Park | Outdoor screening at dusk, with free crafts and activities in Mirabeau Meadows Park starting an hour before the show. July 25, Despicable Me 2; and Aug. 22, Frozen.

South Perry Summer Theater | Bring your lawn chairs and blankets for The Shop's annual (free) summer tradition of projecting movies from its parking lot onto the side of Casper Fry restaurant. Movies start at dusk, every Saturday through Aug. 23. July 26, The Lego Movie; Aug. 2, Raiders of the Lost Ark; Aug. 9, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug; Aug. 16, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure; Aug. 23, Frozen.

Friends of Pavillion Park Movies in the Park | All screenings (free) start at dusk and are free to the public. Pavillion Park movies: July 26, Turbo; Aug. 2, The Princess Bride; Aug. 9, Star Trek Into Darkness; Aug. 29, Brave. Half Moon Park movies: July 25, How to Train Your Dragon; Aug. 16, The Croods

Airway Heights Moonlight Movie Series | Screenings (free) start at dusk in the outfield of Martella Ball Field at Sunset Park. July 25, National Treasure; Aug. 8, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2; Aug. 29, Free Willy.

Spokane County Parks Swim and a Movie | The Northside and Southside Family Aquatics Facilities host a two-hour evening swim, followed by a family film screening. Gates open at 6 pm; movies start at dusk. $2-$3. Aug. 2, The Lego Movie; Aug. 16, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2.

THEATER

Tomato Plant Girl | An outdoor theater performance on the lawn of the University of Idaho's Hartung Theater, featuring a script geared toward younger audiences. Picnic meals are welcome and encouraged. Showing July 24-26, and July 31-Aug. 2 at 7 pm. $5/youth ages 16 and under; $15/adults. (208-885-6465)  

Shakespeare in the ParkMontana-based Shakespeare in the Park travels around the Western U.S. every summer, performing free plays to the public. This year's Spokane stop is a performance of "As You Like It," on Sat, Aug. 23, at 5 pm, in Liberty Lake's Pavillion Park.

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Why the Coeur d'Alene Casino changed its mind on Ted Nugent

Posted By on Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 10:43 AM

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You may have been a little confused when the advertisements rolled out, including the full back page of the Inlander, announcing that Ted Nugent would be playing the Coeur d'Alene Casino in August.

First off, you'd be forgiven for not knowing who Ted Nugent is if A) you aren't a fan of 1980s agro-rock or B) you don't watch Fox News (or The Daily Show, for that matter).

But if you do know about Ted Nugent, you, like me, probably thought he'd given up his guitar in favor of shooting large animals, campaigning for losing presidential candidates, sitting on the National Rifle Association board, and getting investigated by the Secret Service for implying that he was going to harm the president. But yes, Ted Nugent does still tour as a musician. He's playing a theater in New Jersey tonight, in fact.

Nugent's show slated for Aug. 4 at the Coeur d'Alene Casino, though, has been canceled by the venue after the Tribal Council learned of Nugent's history of ridiculous, racist and violent rhetoric.

“The Coeur d’Alene Tribe has always been about human rights – for decades, we have worked individually and as a Tribe to make sure that each and every person is treated equally and with respect and dignity. We know what it’s like to be the target of hateful messages and we would never want perpetuate hate in any way,” said Chief Allan, Chairman of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in a statement released yesterday.

The tribe asserted that they were unaware of Nugent's penchant for controversial rhetoric until they got a call from Bill Morlin, who you should remember from his excellent work over the years for the Spokesman Review, who now writes for the Southern Poverty Law Center's Hatewatch blog. Click here for Morlin's account of what transpired when he asked the casino if it saw anything controversial in booking Nugent.

Hours later after Morlin raised the question, the casino had canceled the show.


Nugent's most known racist remark is when he called the president of the United States a "subhuman mongrel," but he also penned this editorial about why the Washington Redskins shouldn't have to change their name. In the piece, Nugent says his song "Great White Buffalo" has made him beloved in Native American communities. A viewing of him performing that song in a headdress (see above) makes that somewhat hard to believe, as well as him saying things like, "Call me crazy horse..."

This isn't the first time the self-proclaimed Motor City Madman (he gave himself the name because he's from Detroit and he's crazy) has had a show canceled for being, at best, a little out there. A city in Texas agreed to pay him $16,000 not to show up at their Fourth of July festival this year.


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MORNING BRIEFING: Canceling Nugent and repaying Gerlach's defense

Posted By on Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 8:43 AM

AROUND HERE

The Coeur d'Alene Casino has canceled Ted Nugent's Aug. 4 show because of his "racist attitudes and views." (SR)

Police have released more details about the woman shot and killed by police outside Bonner General Health in Sandpoint. (CdA Press)

A judge has authorized more than $220,000 in taxpayer money to repay Gail Gerlach's legal fees. (SR)

President Obama will be in Seattle campaigning tonight, including at a dinner event that costs $25,000 a plate. (Seattle Times)

As central Washington wildfire victims begin rebuilding, local residents are offering help. (KXLY) Plus, watch this video of just how devastating the damage is.

Carlton Complex Fire Devastation Part 2 from Chelan HD Productions on Vimeo.

ELSEWHERE

Israel says one of its soldiers is missing as conflict in Gaza continues. (Al Jazeera)

The bodies of those killed on MH17 have been moved to eastern Ukraine and out of the combat area. (NYT)

Other departments are poaching Detroit's low-paid police officers. (NPR)

The economy is making it harder to have kids. (WaPo)


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Monday, July 21, 2014

Who do you think is making a difference in the Inland Northwest? Nominate them!

Posted By on Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 5:40 PM

Brent and Amy Hendricks won the Peirone Prize in 2011 for their outstanding work helping refugees. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Brent and Amy Hendricks won the Peirone Prize in 2011 for their outstanding work helping refugees.


Calling all humanitarians, philanthropists, artists, environmentalists and activists: Who do you think is making a positive difference in the Inland Northwest?

We're currently looking for nominees for our fifth annual Peirone Prize — a cash reward recognizing passionate, local folks who have dedicated their lives to the service of others. Previous winners include Jamie Borgan  the program director of New Leaf Bakery; Virla Spencer, the outreach coordinator at Center for Justice; and Brent and Amy Hendricks, founders of Global Neighborhood. One of our goals is to inspire young people to get involved in our community, so we're especially looking for people under or around the age of 35.

Know anyone who deserves our support? Please send us the names of the people you'd like to nominate to giveguide@inlander.com no later than Friday, Aug. 1. In your email, include their ages and a brief explanation as to why they deserve recognition. We'll choose three winners based on your responses and showcase their contributions to the community in our annual Give Guide issue on Aug. 28.

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Battling feelings of empathy, guilt and relief as wildfires burn across the region

Posted By on Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 2:42 PM

The scene yesterday near the Watermelon Hill fire, which is still burning about 7 miles southwest of Cheney. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • The scene yesterday near the Watermelon Hill fire, which is still burning about 7 miles southwest of Cheney.

The hazy, smoky air still makes my stomach curdle with fear.

I was 4 when the regional disaster known as Firestorm torched the Spokane area. On Oct. 16, 1991, heavy winds downing power lines sparked more than 90 separate fires around the Inland Northwest, burning more than 100 homes and blackening the land all around. I vividly recall Firestorm’s terrifying uncertainty, and now view it as one of the most impactful events of my childhood, growing up on 20 wooded, rural acres in Stevens County.

After the first flames ignited and sent embers flying, my parents quickly packed up our valuable belongings — antique furniture, family heirlooms, photographs and important documents — and rented a storage unit in Spokane. My mom packed clothing and we made the short drive to my grandparent’s 80-acre farm above our home on a hill. It was safer there, with more routes out if the fire moved in. One night during the fires, my dad took me outside, lifting me up on his shoulders. There, in my striped nightgown, I saw the mountain vista in front of our homes glowing with orange flames against the black night sky.

We were lucky. The firestorm burned for days all around the region, but our land and our homes remained untouched. It was the first memory I’d have of many more fires to threaten our rural community. Each one filled me with more terror than the last. Just as anxiety-causing were summer’s hot, dry spells, lightning storms and windy days that all meant high fire danger. The fires alone didn’t make fear course through my body, but the materialistic thought of losing everything in a fire’s wake.

As residents across the Inland Northwest woke up this past Friday morning to a brown sky blocking out the rays of a blood red sun, the dense ashy air left a fine, grayish-black powder on everything it touched. Street lights stayed on long past sunrise, and the world was cast in an ominous, yet eerily beautiful, goldish glow. These remnants of wildfire stirred up my long-dormant feelings of dread. I tried to imagine the emotions of residents of Central Washington — the people in Brewster and Pateros who lost everything in the still burning Carlton Complex fire. In place of a desire for empathy was something stronger — guilt. Guilt that here I was, conjuring up old childhood fears of losing my home to a raging wildfire when they just had.

When natural disasters — tornadoes, hurricanes, mudslides, earthquakes, tsunamis and forest fires — strike, our collective reaction is to consume breaking news reports. We become almost morbidly fascinated by the images and stories of destruction fed to us, all so accessible on our social media accounts. At the same time we ache for the losses of others due to what’s largely attributed a random event. The Carlton fire was sparked by lightning; the whims of changing winds paired with the intense summer heat propelled it toward towns with little warning.

Every region of the world comes with its own set of natural threats. Those who choose to call these places home do so with some understanding of the chance they might be affected by a mostly unpredictable disaster. But until one happens to or close to us, that probability doesn’t dominate our thoughts.

Most of us will never lose our homes to wildfires. But when we see it happen on such a tragically large scale like the Carlton Complex fire, we’re reminded of our vulnerability to the odds and also comforted by it. Homes can be rebuilt and things replaced, but the scars of any disaster will live on in the landscape and its victims memories forever.  ♦

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MORNING BRIEFING: Problems with Washington's health exchange and how to help wildfire victims

Posted By on Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Firefighters continue to battle the Carlton Complex fire and the Watermelon Hill fire outside of Cheney. You can help victims of Washington's forest fires by donating to the Red Cross or other efforts listed here. (SR/KXLY/Wenatchee World)

A body was found on the shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene early Saturday. Police have not yet identified the victim. (CDA Press)

Conservatives on the Spokane City Council are worried the liberal majority will pick another liberal to fill departed Councilman Steve Salvatori's seat. (SR)

Some people who've bought insurance through Washington's state exchange are still having issues with the site. (Seattle Times)

ELSEWHERE

Death and destruction continue in Israel and the Gaza Strip. (NYT)

A friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been convicted of obstructing justice. (NPR)

Separatists in eastern Ukraine have agreed to hand over the black boxes from a Malaysian plane that was shot down and allow investigators into the area. (WaPo)

China has suspended operations at the meat supplier used by Chinese branches of McDonald's and KFC amid accusations the supplier repackaged expired meat products. (BBC)


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Sunday, July 20, 2014

PHOTOS: Today's Food Truck Palooza

Posted By on Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 7:50 PM

The first Food Truck Palooza showcased the food, deserts and beverages of 18 different vendors. A entry ticked allowed anyone free samples from all of the vendors. Dj Mayhem entertained fifteen hundred ticket holders and a beer garden was not far away for those of age. 

Fifteen hundred people gather in the parking lot just west of Luigi's Restaurant for Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Fifteen hundred people gather in the parking lot just west of Luigi's Restaurant for Food Truck Palooza.

DJ Mayhem, a DJ of 12 years, plays for the crowd at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • DJ Mayhem, a DJ of 12 years, plays for the crowd at Food Truck Palooza.

Steven Kitchnes, left, Mike Anderson  and Tymen Hofmann of Three Ninjas work quickly to prepare food for hungry customers at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Steven Kitchnes, left, Mike Anderson and Tymen Hofmann of Three Ninjas work quickly to prepare food for hungry customers at Food Truck Palooza.

Phil Conway. left, speaks with Steven Kitchnes of Three Ninjas at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Phil Conway. left, speaks with Steven Kitchnes of Three Ninjas at Food Truck Palooza.

Steven Kitchnes speaks with customers at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Steven Kitchnes speaks with customers at Food Truck Palooza.

Food Truck Palooza featured 18 different vendors. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Food Truck Palooza featured 18 different vendors.

Alex Kokkoris, left and Rebecca Circkman get pulled pork from Nordic Smoke at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Alex Kokkoris, left and Rebecca Circkman get pulled pork from Nordic Smoke at Food Truck Palooza.

Andrew, left, and Elizabeth Sibulski order brownie bites from Love at First Bite at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Andrew, left, and Elizabeth Sibulski order brownie bites from Love at First Bite at Food Truck Palooza.

Joile Fomal, left, hands fried Macaroni to a customer at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Joile Fomal, left, hands fried Macaroni to a customer at Food Truck Palooza.

Frances Wang, left, and Shawn Chitnis order ice cream from Jennifer Davis, owner of the Scoop at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Frances Wang, left, and Shawn Chitnis order ice cream from Jennifer Davis, owner of the Scoop at Food Truck Palooza.

Nick Bokarica, co-owner of Shameless Sausage, stuff cheese in sausages at Food Truck Palooza. - MATT WEIGAND
  • Matt Weigand
  • Nick Bokarica, co-owner of Shameless Sausage, stuff cheese in sausages at Food Truck Palooza.

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Saturday, July 19, 2014

10 Ways to Afford Extra Summer Expenses (Spoiler: No. 10: Stop Paying Bills)

Posted By on Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 9:58 AM

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Not yet half way into summer vacation, families like mine are starting to feel the pinch of added expenses, restless kids and less income. In fact, the mental stress of financing the months of summer can become so all-consuming that our relationships turn tense and we risk losing the enjoyment of the season.

Here are a few ways I’ve tried to make or save money to fund that kids’ camp, movie night, Silverwood excursion, evening date, camping trip or kayak rental when I’m empty in the pockets:

1. Dig Deeper. I found an extra $25 just by going through winter coat pockets, looking under the seats in my car and digging in the sofa. That’s dinner or a movie for two.

2. Babysit Pets.
My 12-year-old would love to own and breed all kind of animals, but I am not a big pet fan. Our compromise is that he can babysit non-vicious dogs and cats at our home. He’s already earned enough to pay for two Silverwood trips, snacks included.

3. Sell Your Stuff. I admit, I have no patience for sitting in the sun all day running a yard sale or managing ads on craigslist, but I am trying out Tradesy.com currently for selling clothes and have found some of the local shop-and-swap networks to be quite effective.

4. Use Your Body. I’m not suggesting organ donation or red-light-district activity, but plasma donors are always needed here in Spokane, and there are medical research teams looking for test subjects for products you might already be using, like allergy meds or nasal spray.

5. Rent What You Own. I’m not a big fan of having random roommates, although we do host international students on occasion. But, renting out a garage or toolshed for storage is less invasive to your privacy and can add enough supplemental monthly income to cover a road trip by fall.

6. Tap Your Talents. Making a summer camp out of your skill set, teaching a few private (art, music, dance) lessons, or teaming up with a friend to trade your expertise are all great ways to turn a profit. I am trading art lessons for guitar lessons and have also taught with Spokane Art School and other organizations on a class-by-class basis.

7. Be Exotic. Yes, this area has its limits, but there are some fun ways to explore and express in Spokane. I participated as a vendor in the new outdoor art event, Bazaar, and will be spicing up things in August as a model for the Blackwood Art Clothing line at Runway Renegades. Participating in events that pay in excitement or networking can bring fresh ideas to your life.

8. Go Hastings. Buy-backs aren’t hugely lucrative, but if you have upgraded to BluRay or no longer have an Xbox 360, why keep the archaic stuff around? Entertainment and gaming stores usually buy back or trade consoles and games.

9. Pawn It. Sometimes you will get just as much or more for your equipment, electronics, musical instruments or jewelry at a pawn shop as you will sitting in the hot sun (or rain) all day running a yard sale. My kids pawned enough of their outdated items to purchase a couple hundred dollars of new entertainment gear.

10. Stop Paying Bills. Maybe you don’t really need that iPad on your phone line anymore or aren’t using Hulu Plus or tanning and going to the gym during the summer. For some companies, you can temporarily put your services on hold, revise your plan or eliminate your membership altogether. I saved about $85 a month by revising my services this summer. ♦

Rachel Dolezal, formerly of the Human Rights Education Institute in Coeur d'Alene, is an award-winning artist and activist who teaches courses in art, Africana history and culture at area universities.



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PHOTOS: Summer Parkways at Corbin Park

Posted By on Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:41 AM

A couple of hundred people biked and walked on streets, blocked off to motor vehicle traffic, around Corbin Park for Spokane Summer Parkways. Residents and visitors alike used this opportunity to leisurely make their way around the park or listen to music. Groups of people stopped every once in a while to socialize or eat.


Five-year-old Carmen Walter, center, rides in a trailer as her father Jeff pedals, with the rest of the family following. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Five-year-old Carmen Walter, center, rides in a trailer as her father Jeff pedals, with the rest of the family following.

Gus, a 5-year-old Bassett Hound - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Gus, a 5-year-old Bassett Hound

Josh Hofer and his Electra Straight 8 - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Josh Hofer and his Electra Straight 8

Erick Erickson, right, and Jo Pickens enjoy Tibetan dumplings. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Erick Erickson, right, and Jo Pickens enjoy Tibetan dumplings.

Heather Striker, center - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Heather Striker, center

Six-year-old Chloee Cline - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Six-year-old Chloee Cline

Jamey Calhoun and his wife Hayley, with their 2-year-old daughter Elsa in a wagon. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Jamey Calhoun and his wife Hayley, with their 2-year-old daughter Elsa in a wagon.

Rob Brewer and his 1-year-old daughter Winnie in the front seat. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Rob Brewer and his 1-year-old daughter Winnie in the front seat.

Larry Smith and his custom bike he built off a Dyno frame. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Larry Smith and his custom bike he built off a Dyno frame.

Mark Simonds - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Mark Simonds

Peggy Smith - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Peggy Smith

Sara, center, and Jesse Brown, of the Sara Brown Band, perform. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Sara, center, and Jesse Brown, of the Sara Brown Band, perform.

Emerson-Garfield Neighborhood Council Member Eline Helm with her 6-month-old daughter Linnea listening to the Sara Brown Band. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Emerson-Garfield Neighborhood Council Member Eline Helm with her 6-month-old daughter Linnea listening to the Sara Brown Band.

(Left to right) Heidi Arbogast, Eva Silverstone and Mary Bacon speak. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • (Left to right) Heidi Arbogast, Eva Silverstone and Mary Bacon speak.

A family break. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • A family break.

Lauren Stewart, center, and Will Dewey ride the parkway. - YOUNG KWAK
  • Young Kwak
  • Lauren Stewart, center, and Will Dewey ride the parkway.

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