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2008 Visual Arts Tour 

by DANIEL WALTERS, CARRIE SCOZZARO and TERRY LAWHEAD & r & & r & & lt;span class= "dropcap " & "T & lt;/span & errain" is an opening salvo from the Wonderground Collective -- a small "guerrilla" organization dedicated to blasting Spokane's young musical and artistic talent into the public eye.





"There's something worth talking about here," says Mariah McKay, Wonderground's 24-year-old co-founder. "People are slowly awakening to the potential of what our city has."





While working with KYRS Thin Air Radio, McKay saw dozens of talented, passionate artists toiling away on their own little islands of creativity, most of them unaware of all the other passionate artists who were stranded on other islands. To help turn those islands into a continent, she formed Wonderground.





For Terrain's terraformers, location was key. The stop on the Visual Arts Tour had to be deep in the heart of downtown Spokane. Wonderground winnowed 40 possible locations for the event down to one: The old Sterling Bank vault on Post Street. Tom Stieritz, the building's owner, donated the space to spotlight the positive creations of the younger generation.





"It has to do with the renovation and resurrection of downtown Spokane," Stieritz says. "This was a dead area 15 years ago."





The Vault will be packed to the brim with musicians, poets, dancers and comedians performing in genres ranging from rock 'n' roll to neo-soul, from hip-hop to power pop. And those are just the performing artists. Lining the halls and walls of the vault will be paintings, photographs, videos and mixed-media conglomerations. Let's face it: The entire event is a mixed-media conglomeration.





"It's a real smorgasbord," McKay says. "Putting them all in the same level at the same time creates an interesting dynamic."





Many of the event's performers see Terrain's different styles and types of art as intertwined, crackling with symbiosis.





"I think music and visual art can go really well together," musician Dane Ueland says. Empyrean, Ueland says, has already found success by promoting art pieces at their concerts.





"It's hard enough to get people to come to concerts," says Kaylee Cole, who will be playing a mixed set with Ueland. "I'm not an artist, but I imagine that it's difficult to get to people to come to art shows."





Cole hopes Terrain's combination of music and the visual arts will meld together the audiences for both.





Artist Scott Kolbo says Terrain will bring a unique audience and viewing mindset to the artwork displayed. "What I like the most about the Terrain concept is it takes the art out of the gallery," Kolbo says. "It's not like you're going someplace just to see a work of art. It's a holistic experience."





In particular, Kolbo says he's impressed with Terrain's non-commercial feel. "It's more of a celebration of things being made than of selling them." Kolbo says. "You get the sense that they're throwing the show together for a day, and it's going to be a crazy blowout."





Both Kolbo and Ueland weren't familiar with many of the artists booked for Terrain. That's perfect, McKay says. Introducing innovators to each other is a vital aspect of Terrain. A few handshakes and "Mover, I'd like you to meet Shaker" moments and the artistic community becomes that much closer.





"There's this kind of residual roaring going on underneath the surface of Spokane," Wonderground member Ginger Ewing says. Terrain aims to expose and amplify that.





McKay says it's happening already. She says Spokane is becoming a more confident and unique city, gradually defeating its own defeatism. "Spokane's identity is becoming more infused with the sense of pride and integrity -- less of a sense of being lost or just another generic American city." McKay says. "We're starting to tell our own stories and take control of them."





So perhaps Terrain is less of an earthquake or tsunami wave of creativity, but more like an inkwell. And on Friday night, dozens of diverse artists are showing up to dip their pens.





-- Daniel Walters





TWO NEW VENUES


& lt;span class= "dropcap " & S & lt;/span & ometimes more is better, as in this year's Visual Arts Tour, which has expanded in coverage and density. According to the Spokane Arts Commission's arts director, Karen Mobley, VAT has grown steadily over the years. "When I came to the Arts Commission 11 years ago," Mobley says, "a 'big' Visual Arts Tour had 16 venues." This year, the list tops out at 35.





Several of this year's venues are "off the map" -- meaning not within walking distance of downtown but worth exploring. Indeed, two of the venues have moved heaven and earth in the name of art.





Although it isn't unusual to convert a church to a gallery, it is unusual to have a gallery in a church. Clearstory Gallery, located in the Life Center Foursquare Church (1202 N. Government Way, 499-2678), celebrates the genesis of a new approach to art. According to gallery organizer Susan Cowger, artists exhibiting at Clearstory are "connecting people to God through the influence of image, color and form."





Cowger, an accomplished writer and teacher, will be part of the apostolic 12 artists participating in the inaugural exhibit, "UnDone," which, she writes, explores "connection and disconnection, truth and misconception, and freedom and constraint."





Other artists include Stephen Rue, the son of Lutheran ministers, whose 2007 exhibition at Lorinda Knight interwove Renaissance styling and Christian themes; Kathleen Cavender, best known for her idyllic landscapes; and Whitworth University art professor Gordon Wilson.





At Whitworth (300 W. Hawthorne Rd., 777-3258), earth has already been moved to make way for the Ernst F. Lied Center for the Visual Arts. The 20,000-square-foot Center includes new classrooms and galleries; the Bryan Oliver Gallery will host "Old Bones in a New Vernacular: Whitworth Permanent Collection."





According to gallery director Meagan Stirling, it's "one of the most tangible expressions of the university's abiding commitment to art" and will feature works created by alumni and faculty, such as the "Portable War Memorial" by Edward Kienholz, who attended the college in the 1940s. Donated and university-commissioned works will also be included, such as Robert Motherwell's 1970 serigraph from his "Basque Series."





While art hangs on the walls inside the new gallery, an exhumation will be going on outside to ritualize the transition from the old Fine Arts building to the new Whitworth Center. Artist and SCC instructor Tom O'Day will dig up the 30 works he buried on the campus 20 years ago, eventually reassembling them in an exhibition slated for Feb. 17-April 3 in the Bryan Oliver Gallery. MAC curator Ben Mitchell will be on hand to deliver a talk before the 8 pm exhumation.





-- CARRIE SCOZZARO





BEN JOYCE


& lt;span class= "dropcap " & F & lt;/span & or centuries, great thinkers including Novalis, Holderlin, Heidegger and Sartre have said that all of philosophy and the arts is basically homesickness -- that they give expression to our unsuccessful efforts to feel at home in the world.





I wish I could somehow take those guys to the show by Spokane artist Ben Joyce at Barrister Winery this weekend.





The hunger for a sense of place is driving our rootless society in unprecedented new directions, and culture is reflecting this shift. I'm no art critic -- I gravitate instead toward writers about this subject -- Walt Whitman, Robinson Jeffers, Robert Sund, Wendell Berry, Gary Snyder -- but I am captivated by Joyce's work.





He says he considers his style to be Abstract Realism. I'd opt for a new genre: Magical Localism. Or maybe Topophilia Surreal.





"My paintings are abstract interpretations of geographical maps," says Joyce. "The sculpted edges of my canvases are also actual lines from the map. I invite the viewers to use their imagination and familiarity with the area depicted to create a three-dimensional image in which he or she can travel."





It worked for me. After the split-second blink of recognition of seeing something mysteriously familiar (like a map of Spokane), I began mentally filling in all these little details from my life. The image itself was abstract; it resembled nothing human or physical. It was grids and shapes. It was artwork. I thought, "Piet Mondrian on mushrooms -- how clever."





But my own memories were effortlessly populating -- personalizing -- the empty spaces of the art work (enhanced from a familiar street map) with my experiences. Was I projecting my love of the landscapes and memories of where I live onto a Rorschach chart hanging on a wall in a gallery? Joyce just grinned.





I have always loved maps and having a sense of where I am. But the images of where we live have been literalized and Google-ized into computer-generated aerial shots that are impersonal. Some of the details I was projecting onto Joyce's art were informed by trips to the dentist with my children, floating down a river, parties, cross country skiing, gardening, flat tires -- all the mundane and dramatic moments of my life in one place. Joyce's map-art is not the literal country, but it is a symbolic representation of the lives we live.





Joyce, a Gonzaga alumnus, has studied in Italy and is currently showing work in Los Angeles and Portland with images from all over the world. His stuff is grasped quickly; curators have actually shouted out, pleased that they recognize the landscapes he creates.





"Every place is special to the people who love it most," says Joyce. "As the viewer takes the time to connect with a painting, it becomes interactive, and I can actually see the moment where they begin to travel through it."





That's when you get the full-tilt homecoming.





-- Terry Lawhead





2008 VISUAL ARTS TOUR OF SPOKANE


& lt;span class= "dropcap " & A & lt;/span & ll venues will be open Friday, October 3, from 5-9 pm.Some exhibits will also be open Saturday, October 4, as noted below. Sponsored by Spokane Arts Commission and The Inlander.





As a special feature, a variety of musicians will perform on street corners throughout downtown to raise awareness of homelessness in our community. You may spot a few celebrities as well as business people with a musical streak out there promoting Heartsongs.





MUSEUM OF ARTS & amp; CULTURE


2316 W. FIRST AVE.


Ji Ruoxiao: Chinese Sumi Brush Paintings This short term exhibit features the original sumi brush paintings created by Ji Ruoxiao as illustrations for the new book by Eastern Washington University Press titled Harmony: Chinese Wisdom for Children and Parents. The artist will sign books from 5-7 pm. The exhibit of Sumi brush paintings on the main floor is free. The rest of the MAC and Campbell House are open by donation on Friday evening. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 11 am-5 pm. Thru Oct. 11. 363-5330





KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY


115 S. ADAMS ST.


Contemporary Ceramics Residents from the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana, will exhibit their work. Nicolas Darcourt, a figurative sculptor, and David Peters will present a free public workshop on Saturday (533-3412). Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-4 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 458-5517





TRACKSIDE STUDIO


115 S. ADAMS ST.


Chris Kelsey and Mark Moore Kelsey specializes in futuristic sculpture reflecting geological and architectural themes. Moore creates functional pots from recycled ceramic materials and minimally decorated platters. A free ceramic workshop given by current residents of the Archie Bray Foundation with demonstrations and slide shows will take place on Saturday. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-4 pm. Thru Nov. 1. 462-5653





BARRISTER WINERY


1213 W. RAILROAD AVE.


Ben Joyce: Cities of the World Ben Joyce embraces globalism as he presents abstract interpretations of maps of cities throughout the world. He works in a wide range of mediums from canvas to wood to plaster. Here's your opportunity to travel to Florence, New York, Beijing, Prague and Chicago without leaving Spokaloo. "Lonesome" Lyle Morse will play acoustic blues from 7-10 pm. Friday 5-10 pm; Saturday noon-5 pm. Thru Oct. 25. 993-9310





SPOKANE ART SUPPLY


1303 N. MONROE ST.


Lian Zhen and the Employees of Spokane Art Supply: Lian Meet Staff. Staff, Lian Two exhibits represent a mixture of artistic styles and cultures. The staff will display oil paintings, mixed-media pop art, photography and watercolors. Guest artist Lian Zhen is an internationally recognized artist and author. Her work is a blend of traditional Chinese painting and contemporary watercolor. She says, "A beautiful painting depicts the harmony between nature and imagination." Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-5 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 327-6628





THE SPOKANE CLUB


1002 W. RIVERSIDE AVE.


Val Frey: Asian Botanicals Val Frey will transport you to Southeast Asia and surround you with lush vegetation and dancing peonies, hibiscus and orchids. The artist captures the life force of tropical gardens in Malaysia and India, her homes for over a decade. Her talent lies in putting a signature spin (expressive lines, brilliant layers, and delicate floral shapes) on this botanical energy and serving it up with depth, movement and emotion. The pieces in this collection were created using oils, watercolor and batik. Enjoy live piano music played by Theresa McKay and a reception for the artist. Friday 5-8 pm. Thru Dec. 1. 459-4242





AVENUE WEST GALLERY


122 S. MONROE ST., SUITE 103


Mike Folsom: Organic Symmetry It's time to check out the new space for the cooperative gallery that has moved around the corner to become neighbors with the Brooklyn Deli. As a photographer, Folsom is an eye on the world - from fine geometric details of flowers and insects to sweeping landscape vistas. All images are digitally enhanced to show the photographer's aspirations to understand the world: You can find beauty and symmetry and wonder in roadside weeds, grains of stone, and the skin of a peach. Tracy Carr will play the guitar and sing. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 11 am-6 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 456-3178





SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY


906 W. MAIN AVE.


Spokane Watercolor Society: Annual Juried Show. Nationally known juror Charles Reid will select 50-55 water media paintings for the Society's annual show. Awards will be presented at 7 pm Friday. Friday 6-9 pm; Saturday 8 am-8 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 536-6635





GALLERY OF THUM


159 S. LINCOLN ST., SUITE 151


Group exhibit 4 artists will be featured in the street-side gallery that is part of Steam Plant Square. Bobbie Wieber will show watercolors, Andrea Griechen will present mosaics, and Floy Kinsella will show works in a wide variety of mediums. Doug Johnson's ink drawings will be there, and the artist will sign his latest book Ten Years to Hold Your Breath Friday evening and all day Saturday. Laddie Ray Melvin will play music. Friday 5-9:45 pm; Saturday noon-6:30 pm. Thru Oct. 25. 294-9234





FREEMAN CENTER


170 S. LINCOLN ST.


Fall Celebration At Peters & amp; Sons Flowers, Gifts and Gallery watercolors and sumi-e paintings by Keiko von Holt will share the spotlight with kaleidoscope windows by OnDWalls. There will be a drawing for free art. The Grande Ronde Wine Cellar features oils, acrylics, watercolors, blown glass, marble sculpture, and wood carvings by Northwest artists. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 9 am-6 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 624-4151





CHASE GALLERY


808 W. SPOKANE FALLS BLVD.


USE POST ST. ENTRANCE


Stephen Chalmers: Transience Chalmers used a large-format camera to capture "snowbirds" in their natural habitat in the Sunbelt of the southwestern United States. He notes that over the last 50 years, "trailers and self-contained RV's became the means and transportation to live elsewhere and to experience the country without sacrificing the comforts of home." His color photographs and interviews with individuals who use RVs as permanent homes reflect their way of life and the landscape they occupy. Friday 5-9 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 625-6050





MOBIUS KIDS


RIVER PARK SQUARE - 808 W. MAIN AVE., LOWER LEVEL


Mixing at Mobius: FundRaising Event and art by Viola Unger: Creation of Animals Enjoy looking at watercolor and acrylic paintings and sampling refreshments while you support the Children's Museum during the third annual Mixing at Mobius event. $40 per ticket. Friday 6-9 pm. Thru Nov. 28. 624-5437 ext. 305





ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS


RIVER PARK SQUARE - 808 W. MAIN AVE., LEVEL 3


Kent Henderson: Photography Kent alters photographs of Northwest subjects through Photoshop to enhance colors and shapes. Among the works on display are photographs of the Monroe Street Bridge which reveal its beauty from various angles. Friday 5-10 pm, Music from 6-8:30 pm; Saturday 11 am-10 pm. Thru Nov. 30. 747-3903





KRESS GALLERY


RIVER PARK SQUARE - 808 W. MAIN AVE., LEVEL 3


Kay O'Rourke and Gina Freuen: Intersections Known for her personal storytelling through image and color, Kay paints tulips, cardinals, and even cherry jello in her new work. Her bold, romantic, oil or pastel compositions are entertaining and out of the ordinary. O'Rourke's sister, Gina Freuen, tells her own complex but quieter story through her one-of-a-kind porcelain and stoneware vessels. They are rich with pattern and striking in their connecting parts that add up to a vital whole. Gina will also be showing a small series of digitally composed wall pieces based on intersecting lines. The two sisters have also joined their artistic energies to create pieces together; what one has started the other has finished - intersecting again in life and in their art. Friday 5-9 pm. Thru Jan. 4. 363-5317





LOFTS AT RIVER PARK SQUARE


809 W. MAIN AVE., FLOOR 3


Katie Staib: Granada The artist worked on mural projects for a nonprofit organization in Granada, Nicaragua. The sculptures, paintings, photography and sketches in the current exhibit were created based on her experiences in Central America. A percentage of the proceeds will be donated to the nonprofit organization Building New Hope. There will be music, refreshments, and tours of the condo shells. Friday 5-9 pm. 939-7850





THE ARTIST'S TREE


828 W. SPRAGUE AVE.


Chris May and Elizabeth May: Silent Seeing The generations come together to present photography by Elizabeth May and paintings on canvas by her son Chris. They explore form and reflections in the everyday world. The gallery will also have an eclectic blend of jewelry by local artists. There will be a body-painting demo by multi-talented artist Bill Henry Edge. And to top it off, refreshments and music will be provided. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday noon-7 pm. Thru Oct. 28. 456-2300





SIMPLY NORTHWEST


8 N. POST ST.


Tamara Huss: Tins for Your Treasures Tamara began her project with a goal to create fun ways to display her favorite photos. Her memory boards are handmade in Spokane. Music will be part of the fun at this unique gift shop. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-5 pm. Thru Oct. 4. 456-8206





SPOKANE TRANSIT AUTHORITY


701 W. RIVERSIDE AVE.


Megan Schmall and Brandon Murdo: Arts at the Plaza Megan uses an assortment of materials to create her three-dimensional pieces. For example, the work called "goddess" is shaped with cheese cloth, wood, metal and clay. Brandon's two-dimensional paintings show the beauty of simplicity. His Asian-inspired artwork consists of acrylic paint, Chinese black ink, and paper. Think the Plaza is an ordinary bus station? Think again. Listen to musical poetry at 6 pm and take free Argentine Tango dance lessons at 7:30 pm on Friday. Friday 5-11 pm; Saturday 7 am-9 pm. Thru Oct. 4. 343-1735





MADELEINE'S CAF & Eacute; & amp; PATISSERIE


707 W. MAIN AVE.


Kassidi Hotrum and Mercia Sheets Hotrum's work in acrylic on mixed media is colorful and inspirational. Her youthful enthusiasm for life shines through in her work. Chef de Cuisine Mercia Sheets shows off another side of her talented personality through bright colors and cheerful subject matter. Listen to music by Kevin Gardner and Spare Parts as you pretend to practice your French. C'est si bon! Friday 5-10 pm. Thru Oct. 10. 624-2253





THE VAULT


120 N. WALL ST.


Terrain A new group presents its manifesto: "The Inland Northwest is a region of concealed layers. Most of its people (you, we, us) spend our days shuffling about on the surface, no heed paid to what lies underneath. The Wonderground Collective makes its cause to upset that easy course." Starting last spring, they began to make a survey of the region's untapped resources. They found Terrain: "young artists, performers, musicians and poets toiling beneath our streets, changing the landscape, subverting the structure. Poised to break into the light." See what it's all about here, now. One long evening of music, poetry, dance exhibitions and art: Friday 5 pm-Saturday 1:30 am. 939-0015





ART, MUSIC AND MORE


610 W. SECOND AVE.


Linda Christine and Cyndi E. Morgan: Another Dimension Imagination is the most intriguing and significant aspect of the human mind. It allows a connection between soul and emotion. The paintings in the current exhibit provide that bridge as they dazzle with color. The dream-like quality of Christine's paintings generated by color and movement allows the imagination to expand and create a new experience. Friday 5-midnight; Saturday noon-midnight. 499-6323





LORINDA KNIGHT GALLERY


523 W. SPRAGUE AVE.


Keiko Hara: Verse.Space S One of the region's most celebrated abstract artists returns to the gallery with new paintings and works on paper. Hara explores space through defined shapes and blocks of color as well as through multitudes of small marks. Her recent work builds on Japanese tradition by introducing lively calligraphic strokes to mark a passage from one place to another. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 11 am-6 pm. Thru Nov. 1. 838-3740





O'DOHERTY'S IRISH GRILLE


525 W. SPOKANE FALLS BLVD.


Victor Richardson: Landscapes in a Perfect World April Gleason of Alchemy Fine Art Investments presents prints and originals by an artist who lives in Belfast, Ireland. Influenced by Impressionism and Pointillism, Richardson has developed a fresh and vivid approach to traditional landscapes. He works with pastels, which are dry-powdered pigment molded into a crayon with a binding solution. He says that atmosphere and color are the most important aspects of his work. Share in the luck of the Irish and listen to Irish music. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 5-9 pm. Thru Oct. 4. 290-2645





BRICK WALL GALLERY


530 W. MAIN AVE. - SKYWALK LEVEL


Group exhibit: Photography Featured artists include Joe Nuess, Richard Heinzen, and Dave Sams. A variety of styles will be on view in this new photography gallery in one of downtown's oldest buildings. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-9 pm. Thru Nov. 1. 928-7721





SANT & Eacute;


404 W. MAIN AVE.


Rochelle Craig: Discovering Home Craig is fascinated by organic structures, old houses, open windows, birds' nests, clouds, and rolling hills. She combines imagination and photographs to project her ideas onto canvas. With acrylic paint and natural materials, the artist traces a path from one place to the next in search of happiness and new beginnings. Friday 5-9 pm; 360- Thru Nov. 30. 990-3577





POTTERY PLACE PLUS


203 N. WASHINGTON AVE.


(Or enter through Auntie's)


Dan McGrew and JoAnne Bailey: Wood and Weaving McGrew makes functional and durable pieces using true joinery and solid woods. Inspired by the Shakers, he has spent 30 years perfecting his woodworking skills. Bailey's one-of-a-kind scarves, shawls and wall hangings are a delight to the eye and the hand. She uses chenille, cotton, rayon and silk, taking advantage of the unique properties of each fiber. Her weaving is done by hand or using an eight-harness loom. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-9 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 624-5849





EXPRESS PERSONNEL SERVICES


331 W. MAIN AVE.


Robert Morrison: Private Moments Sometimes it's easy to miss the richness of light and the feel of textures in a familiar city or interior scene. Morrison brings it all to life in his plein air oil paintings of Spokane and the Inland Northwest. Friday 5-9 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 323-9218





THE MISSING PIECE


TATTOO LOUNGE - 410 W. SPRAGUE AVE.


Alexis Hardy and Artists of the Missing Piece: A Body of Work Hardy has prepared a series of photographs portraying people as unique personalities. His work will be juxtaposed against "A Body of Work" by the artists of the Missing Piece. Music by DJ Jade and specialty pizza from neighbor Monterey Caf & eacute;. During the month of October, the studio will be donating half of the proceeds from all cancer-awareness tattoos to Cancer Patient Care. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday noon-9 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 998-5521





NAMASKA


421 W. FIRST AVE.


Melanie Gum: Transformation into Divine Nature: A Series on Alchemy Like the medieval alchemists, Gum seeks knowledge, but she is not attempting to turn base metals into gold. Her abstract and symbolic acrylic works delve into the multi-layered principles of existence. As an artist, she engages in a process of turning something common into something more spiritual. Friday 5-9 pm. Thru Oct. 31. 328-8283





STUDIO CASCADE


177 W. PACIFIC, SUITE 200


Cat Olason and Mark Easton: Dancing Chicken Studio New to the Spokane area, Olason and Easton take a plunge into the local art scene with an exhibit of works in a variety of media. Olason works in oils, clay and textiles while Easton paints with acrylics on canvas. Olason's works are an introspective journey involving archetypal images and symbology and her style varies from whimsical representation to loose expressionism. Easton finds his inspiration in the deep woods of the West. He uses bold colors to explore mythological themes and inner depths. Friday 5-9 pm. 624-5252





JUNDT ART MUSEUM


GONZAGA UNIVERSITY - 502 E. BOONE AVE.


Contemporary Ceramics: Kolva/Sullivan Collection. Local collectors Jim Kolva and Pat Sullivan have amassed an extensive collection of pieces from some of the most influential artists working in clay. Among the artists featured in the Jundt Galleries are Dan Anderson, Chris Antemann, Ruth Duckworth, Margaret Gregg, Carol Guthro, Chris Kelsey, Marilyn Lysohir, Mardis Nenno, Richard Notkin, David Regan, David Shaner, Keith Simpson, Beth Cavener Stichter, and Jason Walker. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday noon-4 pm. Thru Oct. 11. 313-6613





Spokane Collects: Fritz Scholder Prints. The lithographs on display in the Arcade Gallery were created at the Tamarind Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the early 1970s and exemplify Scholder's iconic style. His portrayals of the contemporary Native American experience became a major influence for a generation of artists. All prints are from the collection of John Morey Maurice. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday noon-4 pm. Thru Nov. 15. 323-6613





TINMAN GALLERY


811 W. GARLAND AVE.


Leonard Heid: Palouse Landscapes Brilliant and luminescent scenes from the area around Moscow, Idaho, are rendered in oil on canvas. The paintings range in width from 10 inches to more than 6 feet. Heid takes months of painstaking glazing and layering to produce each work. Live music by Steve Simmons and Rick Singer. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-6 pm. Thru Nov. 1. 325-1500





OLIVER GALLERY


LIED CENTER FOR THE ARTS - WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY


Old Bones in a New Vernacular: Whitworth Permanent Collection Here's a chance to see the new visual arts building on the idyllic Whitworth campus as well as an exhibit with new acquisitions and prominent works from the collection. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-2 pm. Thru Oct. 19. 777-3258





CLEARSTORY GALLERY


1202 N. GOVERNMENT WAY


Ten artists: Undone On Friday evening, a new gallery opens in Life Center Foursquare Church. According to director Susan Cowger, they are "connecting people to God through the influence of image, color, and form." The inaugural exhibit explores connection and disconnection, truth and misconception, and freedom and constraint. Featured artists include Kathleen Cavender, Stephen Rue, Gordon Wilson and Jesse Pierpoint. Friday 5-9 pm. Thru Dec. 31. 499-2678





SPOKANE POTTERS GUILD


1404 N. FISKE ST.


Ceramics A variety of hand-built and wheel-thrown work will be on exhibit. There will be a mix of raku, sculptural and functional pieces. Friday 5-9 pm; Saturday 10 am-3 pm. 220-9615

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