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Jack Nisbet 

  • Soaring Again
  • Soaring Again

    How the MAC brought the condor back to life
      When Scottish naturalist David Douglas arrived in the Northwest in 1825, one of the first creatures he searched for was the bird we now call the California condor.
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  • A Death in the Rain
  • A Death in the Rain

    How Isaac Stevens, Washington Territory’s first governor, died 150 years ago this week
      In April 1861, as Stevens returned to the Territory for a new round of political wars, a much larger conflict exploded into reality at Fort Sumter, South Carolina.
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  • Scats and Dogs
  • Scats and Dogs

    What dog noses are teaching us about endangered species.
      Wasser, an endocrinologist, studies animal populations by looking at the hormone levels of selected individuals. One of the best sources of information? Everyday excrement.
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  • The Gathering Place
  • The Gathering Place

    Two hundred years ago this summer, white people first settled in Spokane. Things haven't been the same since.
      The time was probably early summer of 1810 when a small group of strangers rode into the Spokane village on the flat point of land at the confluence of the Spokane and Little Spokane rivers.
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  • The Duke of Gold
  • The Duke of Gold

    A century ago, miners in Pend Oreille County produced tons of gold and silver — with a ram for a mascot.
  • Roots In History
  • Roots In History

    If your family had depended for generations on camas root, you’d be able to tell one type of nutritious “Indian celery” from another, too
      Each year, in late April or early May, when the white flowers of White Camas (Lomatium canbyi) have dried up and the seeds are beginning to toast in the sun, members of the Spokane Tribe slip away to certain rocky scablands to dig white camas and other roots.
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  • Living With the Legacy

      American history offers many things to make us proud, but there are just as many actions we've undertaken and attitudes we've held that we'd just as soon forget.
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  • A Most Worthy Mortal

      One of the great characters of the early fur trade days in the Columbia District was Finan McDonald, whose 20-year career here began with the establishment of Kootanae House at the source lakes of the Columbia in 1807.
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  • Camping, 1808 Style

      In May of 1808, David Thompson and a handful North West Company voyageurs dragged their canoe ashore at a large Kootenai encampment near the modern town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho.
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  • Old-Time Ophthalmology

      Throughout the days of his long, productive life, fur agent and Inland Northwest explorer David Thompson spent time watching the landscape, observing wildlife, performing neat mathematical calculations on unlined paper, reading and, especially, writing.
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  • Spots in the Snow

      Long before any rumblings of global warming surfaced, winter thaws gladdened the hearts of frozen residents of the Inland Northwest, and early fur trade journals record wild swings in temperature that would reduce a firm base of winter snow to an impossible glush within two day's time.
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  • The Thrower

      This past spring, at the 60th Annual Northwest Anthropology Conference held on the WSU campus in Pullman, Dr. James Chatters offered a glimpse into just how rigorous the life of a professional old-school hunter could be.
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  • "A Most Delightful Ride"

      British Lieutenant Charles William Wilson received his first taste of Eastern Washington in June of 1860, catching a buggy ride from a Dalles steamboat agent to meet a paddle-wheeler that was about to embark on a trip up the Columbia.
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  • Bluffs Calling

      It's Friday noon and retired physician Bob Dickson parks his SUV along the side of the road where Bernard and High Drive meet on Spokane's South Hill.
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  • METEOR RIGHTS

      In the fall of 1902, Willamette Valley farmer Ellis Hughes, "a humble, intelligent Welshman," (according to Scientific American), was cutting wood near the present town of West Linn when lunchtime came.
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  • The Day the Earth Shook

      All was quiet in Eastern Washington and the Columbia country for much of the day on December 14, 1872. In trading posts and tribal villages, people went about their usual business in the near-solstice darkness.
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  • Appreciating Alice

      One evening last spring, I picked up Kalispel elder Alice Blackbear Ignace at her house on the reservation north of Usk and drove her down to Newport so she could give a little talk.
  • The View From Above

      About a year ago, I received an e-mail from an unknown sender with the suffix of nasa.gov. I didn't know anyone at NASA, so I hesitated for a moment, suspicious of spam, but then gave into temptation and clicked it open.
  • Painting Two Waterfalls

      In 1846, after crossing Athabasca Pass with a Hudson's Bay Company fur trade brigade, the Canadian artist Paul Kane stepped into one of the company's large canoes to follow the Columbia River all the way downstream.
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  • Julia Rivet

      Even though the Spokane House journal for 1818-19 has long been lost, most historians believe that an informal marital union of special significance took place there over that winter.
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  • Quills

      In late June 1807, Northwest Company fur agent David Thompson led a party of 19 men, women, and children up the headwaters of the Saskatchewan River and across the Continental Divide.
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  • Old-Timey Clambake

      A t first glance, it looked like the remains of a weekend clambake. But the well-charred piles of freshwater clam shells hadn't been made last month or last year. Instead, these mussel shells were thousands of years old.
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  • Camping at Indian Meadows

      In early September 1809, fur agent David Thompson greeted 16 men and two dozen horses who arrived at a Kootenai encampment near the modern town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho.
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Recent Comments

  • Re: The Food Guru

    • Santé!
      James Beard best of nominee..... Why wouldn't you eat there?

    • on February 28, 2015
  • Re: The Food Guru

    • I highly recommend The Wandering Table. An unforgettable experience is guaranteed!!!

    • on February 28, 2015
  • Re: Cheating Meters

    • Placard abuse occurs just as frequently in free lots as it does at meters. The…

    • on February 28, 2015
  • Re: Next Venture

    • This isn't a review, this is a preview.

    • on February 28, 2015
  • Re: The Contenders

    • Is it true that "Torchwood" TV Series character captain jack harkness awarded in Oscar? what…

    • on February 28, 2015
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