• Issue Archive for
  • Oct 27 - Nov 2, 2005
  • Vol. 13, No. 2

News & Comment

  • Smoking or Non?

    But what can you do? That's the question posed by Initiative 901,
  • Opening Films

    & & by Inlander Staff & & & r & & & The Weather Man & & -- Nicholas Cage's great performance as a well-paid TV forecaster, who's also a nervous wreck of a bad husband and father (no matter how hard he tries to do it right) is what propels the already terrific s
  • Rolling With the Wildebeests

    by Michael Bowen & r & For starters, The Lion King playing surface or "deck" requires a space 70 feet wide and 40 feet deep. (That's along with plenty of maneuvering room -- but then the Opera House is routinely praised for the spaciousness of its backstage,
  • Letters to the Editor

    & & by Inlander Readers & & & r & [Your] sidebar, "The Detroit Story" (The Inlander, 10/20/05) extols the rebirth of their downtown. Let's hope Detroit is not a model for us. They've done almost everything wrong. It's too bad, because I loved Detroit; I grew
  • Now Playing

    & & by Inlander Staff & & & r & & & American Zion & & -- The stirring narrative of the faith that led a persecuted people to Missouri and beyond is one of the most poignant untold tales of American history. It is the account of a valiant struggle to exercise th
  • He's Serlarious

    & & by Ted S. McGregor Jr. & & & r & "So, do you still have that anti-gay, gay mayor?" asks Al Franken from his studio in New York City on the very day his new book hits the street. Even though & lt;i & The Truth (With Jokes) & lt;/i & is already No. 3 on Amazon.com, the
  • Proud Land

    by Michael Bowen & r & In a world where Broadway shows are lucky if they make back their money and close after several months, The Lion King has been on Broadway for eight years. There are at least seven other international "sit-down" (i.e., non-touring) pro
  • Proud Land

    by Michael Bowen & r & In a world where Broadway shows are lucky if they make back their money and close after several months, The Lion King has been on Broadway for eight years. There are at least seven other international "sit-down" (i.e., non-touring) pro
  • DVD Review

    by Luke Baumgarten & r & Embedded & r & This film is a production of Tim Robbins' anti-war play of the same name, but I'd never heard of either until a random Web search. I checked further and found the Internet floating with a conspicuous dearth of information
  • Mixing and Matching 16 Flutes

    "Well, maybe one and a half," says Darlene Drew. That's because she's been down in the orchestra pit, hyperventilating over and through the 16 different flutes
  • Two Right Feet

    One of college football's circles of life will grow complete Saturday afternoon when f
  • Circle of Song

    by Michael Bowen & r & The score for The Lion King begins with the five Elton John and Tim Rice songs from the animated movie that director Julie Taymor chose to include in the stage version, four of them in the first act. First, "Circle of Life" "moves us a
  • Just for the Halibut

    by Ann M. Colford & r & Sometimes lunch is more than lunch. Sometimes it's a glimpse into the human drama. That's what happened when I dropped in at the Salty Dog in Deer Park, where the Quonset hut exterior belies a warm, wood-paneled sports bar inside, the
  • Making Rafiki Real

    by Michael Bowen & r & In her original conception of the Lion King stage version, Julie Taymor may have switched the gender of Rafiki -- transforming the shaman into a wise woman -- but she wanted to retain the character's resemblance to a baboon. Doing that g
  • The Man Inside Mufasa

    by Michael Bowen & r & You shake hands and you know: It's obvious why Rufus Bonds Jr. was cast as the King of the Lions. Gentle, regal, compassionate, he's also slightly remote, as if he knows that he may have to be stern with you, knows that he may need to
  • Buzz Bin

    by Inlander Staff & r & Papers Due Nov. 24 & r & For the 10th year, we're giving writers a chance to wax eloquent about the fictive joys of living in the Northwest. So hie thee to thy laptop, devise a tale of 3,000 to 6,000 words set in the upper left corner of
  • Lion King for Cubbies

    Sunrise on the savanna. Mufasa "the L.K." and his wife Sarabi have a new baby boy, Simba. An
  • Simba and Nala's Dance of Love

    by Michael Bowen & r & In the animated Lion King movie, "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" has cutesy lions cavorting in the jungle. In Julie Taymor's staging, it's transformed into a stunning dance sequence that doesn't stay rooted to the ground -- and keeps t
  • Book Review

    & & by Suzanne Schreiner & & & r & & & & lt;i & At Work In Life's Garden & lt;/i & & & & & Eds. Sarah Conover and Tracy Springberry & & & r & When Sarah Conover was in graduate school, a visiting poet offered this timeless advice: "If you want to be a real writer, don't have
  • Take Two

    by Luke Baumgarten & r & Stay & r & You know from the get-go that Stay is going to be triptacular. The film opens with a tire-view shot of a wheel coming off a vehicle on the Brooklyn Bridge. As the wheel tumbles and comes to rest, we can't see the ensuing cras
  • Keeping Zazu Flapping

    "People don't realize how detailed these pieces are," says puppet supervisor Anne Salt. "This is a high-maintenance show." During the previous night's performance, the comically fl
  • Unintended Consequences

    by Robert Herold & r & With a chest full of medals, eyes straight ahead, Col. Nathan Sassaman, pictured on the cover of the current issue of The New York Times Magazine, looks every bit the part of "West Point's finest." But the article isn't about his trium
  • CD Reviews

    by Ted S. McGregor Jr. and Carey Murphy & r & Dolly Parton & lt;a href= & quot;http://click.linksynergy.com/fs-bin/click?id=rQy1MLe70wI & amp;offerid=78941.463921614 & amp;type=10 & amp;subid= & quot; & Those Were the Days & lt;/a & **** & r & Forget about Karl Rove and Harriet Miers; George W. Bush's b
  • Power of Trust

    Steve Corker, 64, has been around local politics forever, or so it seems. He's been involved on
  • Lewis & Clark Oct. 27-Nov 2, 1805

    On Oct. 22-26, 1805, navigating the Columbia River had been exceedingly difficult for the members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Three major obstructions in the river -- Celilo Falls, the Short Narrows, and the Long Narrows -- test
  • Budget Blackmail?

    & & by Kevin Taylor & & & r & Spokane's latest fiscal crisis took a potentially ugly turn toward politics when the mayor -- weeks away from a recall vote in a sex scandal -- slapped a magic happy face over a multi-million dollar hole in the 2006 budget, gave it
  • Sound Advice

    by Inlander Staff & r & East vs. West & r & Rock Coffee has a massive Halloween show going down on Monday, with some strange, vaguely warlike, setup. Like Spokane bands vs. Seattle bands or some-such: Death to Graves vs. Doomsday 1999, Hollywood Legend vs. Antl

Music & Film

  • Go West, Young Band

    by Darcy Caputo & r & There comes a time in every young working band's life when you want more than the few clubs in your corner of the world can offer. You crave a bigger audience, a change of scenery, and most important, some cash flow to keep you going.
  • Reflections on the Decemberists

    & & by Luke Baumgarten & & & r & As promised, and more or less on time, we've & lt;i & pooled our resources & lt;/i & and come up with a handful of reflections on one of the biggest indie concerts to hit Spokane since, ever. I'd heard rumors and portents of the frenetic
  • Partly Sonny

    by Ed Symkus & r & You can take as much of Nicolas Cage's "serious" acting as you want. You can even give him a well-deserved Oscar for his work in Leaving Las Vegas. Me, I'll take his comic acting over his serious parts any day. At least he got a Best Actor

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