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After a round of poker, relax among brass and dark wood columns in the casino’s adjacent lounge and family restaurant, where they serve up good burgers, sandwiches and build your own pizzas. While the poker room is brightly lit and bustling, the lounge is dimly lit and laid back, just the right ambiance to chill out and order a Long Island Iced Tea or a Mack and Jacks to soothe a poker loss or gear up for a win. (January 2013)

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With big windows offering views of Carnegie Square, Andy’s Bar is a friendly place to stop as you make your way from Browne’s Addition into the core of downtown. You won’t have to deal with any annoying bachelorette parties or noisy boozers. The atmosphere is delightfully laid back, with no pretense. And the sweet potato fries kick ass. (July 2013)

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Atilano’s has gone through a couple of changes since its January 2009 opening, but they still serve damn good California-style burritos for damn cheap prices. And they’re open until 3 am at the downtown location on Fridays and Saturdays, making them close to heaven at the end of a long night of drinking. (July 2013)

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Sandpoint’s Baxters offers inexpensive cuisine and great service in a relaxed setting. Boasting a full menu of soups, salads, sandwiches and burgers made fresh every day with local ingredients, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a cozier eatery named after a puppy. Baxters also serves fresh seafood, wine and beer.

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Big Sky’s is something out of the past. Drink choices are limited to beer and wine, the jukebox pipes out Patsy Cline and you can only pay with cash. Take advantage of the free popcorn, darts or pool. In the summer, its back patio is a popular drinking and hangout spot. (July 2013)

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The Black Cypress is dream-like, filled with mirrors and Edison lights, funky recycled metal fixtures against 100-year-old exposed brick. The menu tightropes between old world and new, reflecting the agricultural bounty of the Palouse while maintaining decidedly Mediterranean roots. With Greek-style meat sauce and mizithra cheese, the Kima is divinely aromatic. The Pasta pomodoro is light with fresh tomatoes and basil, olive oil and Parmesan. Traditional carbonara gets an upgrade with house-smoked bacon. (July 2013)

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The Coeur d’Alene public golf course’s Broken Tee Grill has an extensive menu that’s heavy on burgers and sandwiches, like the breaded-and-fried Pork Chop John ($7), salads, wraps, and appetizers like their signature Broken Tee Wings ($7.49). Breakfast can be biscuits and gravy ($3.50-$6) to omelets ($7-$8), all in a casual, upbeat environment. (CS, 8/10)

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This Coeur d’Alene icon has taken wine tasting to a new level with the addition of its Enomatic self-service system. Now oenophiles can samples wine at will with a pre-paid card. An LED display indicates price per pour (1-, 3- and 5-ounce samples) on wines that otherwise, says restaurant manager and wine steward Naomi Boutz, would average $35 to $40 per bottle. Boutz tries to offer similar wines at different price points, heavy on the reds, and switches out a third of the wines weekly. (July 2013)

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This friendly, shabby-chic eatery and bakery is off the beaten path, located off Highway 195 on the outskirts of the Palouse (10 minutes from downtown). Chaps serves up hearty chorizo omelettes, homemade cinnamon rolls and baked oatmeal for breakfast, fish tacos and meatloaf for lunch, and curry chicken and grilled tilapia for dinner. And at Chaps, there’s always room for dessert (and maybe a vintage cocktail). Their in-house bakery Cake serves up a decadent selection of tiramisu, bavarian cream cake, chocolate mousse and more. (July 2013)

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Clover
Clover, which opened in May 2012, is the joint effort of owners Scott and Liz McCandless and Paul and Marta Harrington. They prepare almost everything from scratch, don’t have a deep-fat fryer, and desserts — called petite bites — are scaled down in size. From herbs grown in the on-site greenhouse to the sustainably raised Rathdrum wheat used in Clover’s bakery, ingredients are carefully sourced. And the bar... well, Paul Harrington wrote the book on modern cocktails. The restaurant got a nice first birthday gift of recognition from Food & Wine — a spot on the Top 100 New American Bars list in the magazine’s Cocktails 2013 book. (July 2013)
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