spokandnboy 
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Recent Comments

Re: “Culture Centers and Tax Shelters

This design is just "Another Brick On the Wall" by Pink Floyd:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_bvT-DGcWw
Is there anything overtly Spokane Indian (aboriginal) about the Architectural Design? For example, does it authentically reflect who we are as this nations "First Planners & Architects" while being rooted in our "Original Instruction" by creator? As a Spokane Tribal member, I advocate tribal Planning & Architecture manifested from the foundations of village planning legacies left to us by our ancestors, "The First Planners"...!!
http://www.planning.org/divisions/indigenous/index.htm

Posted by spokandnboy on 10/21/2010 at 10:06 PM

Re: “Culture Centers and Tax Shelters

Why not encourage and foster the design of contemporary Spokane Indian architecture connected to the traditional forms of the past, to meet the architectural and spatial needs of the Indigenous people in the city of Spokane, Washington in the present? For a contemporary Indigenous architecture and urban planning agenda to genuinely occur parallel to settler colonialism’s understanding of the city of Spokane, it must include enrolled members of the the Spokane Tribe of Indians with degrees in planning & architecture as primary consultants on design projects. This is not to say that non-Indian architects and consultants can’t collaborate with tribes on the design of Indigenous theme architecture and urban planning elements, but rather they must now step aside and encourage Indigenous Spokane Indian architects and urban planners to begin taking the lead. What is missing is the passion from within the Indigenous community that can be communicated by Indigenous Spokane Indian architects and/or consultants. To reclaim Indigenous architectural space, control and continuity of the artifacts must come from the Indigenous people themselves. Would artwork painted, sculpted, sketched, carved, or worked by a non-Indian artist have the stamp of approval to be considered American Indian artwork? Why should American Indian theme architecture and urban planning elements be any different? It requires multiple acts of love.

Posted by spokandnboy on 09/19/2010 at 4:44 PM

Re: “Culture Centers and Tax Shelters

Bogus Empowerment & Tokenism Participation within Tribal Architecture and Planning?
In the context of Architecture & Planning on aboriginal homelands in Spokane, WA in the last few years, one could argue that much of the Tribal Planning & Design that has been initiated or carried out has been based solely in a Western/Anglo planning framework that is often top-down in nature. In this scenario, the planning involves only a small section of the tribal community, usually political elites or leaders such as tribal councilmen, as well as non-Indian planners and architects. Traditional bottom-up tribal planning genuinely involves the input of the whole tribal community including elders, women, students, college graduates (degrees in Architecture, Planning, Parks & Rec, Tourism), youth, and tribal members with disabilities.
Tokenism Participation occurs when the tribal community involvement is really just a kind of ritual therapy or lip service, when in fact the tribal political elites really have the power, influence, and control all along to steer the project in the image of the tribal elites. This type of tribal planning just goes through the motions in a top-down hierarchy with only token consultation of the community.
Bogus Empowerment occurs when tribal elites let the tribal community think they have a voice and the ability to influence outcomes when in reality the tribal community does not have this influence. Tribal elites such as an individual, elected council or interest group makes the decisions. Unfortunately, people with the power and resources to stop this problem, benefit from the social organization and resource distribution that keeps the tribal elites in power. Thus, they maintain these patterns through control over the selection of tribal elites and socialization (brainwashing) of both elites and nonelites to conform to the status quo.
Furthermore, a major obstacle to more inclusive representation in the tribal Architecture and Planning process is the popular belief that public community participation may be viewed as unnecessary, unwieldy, time consuming, and an idealistic dream. The planning process is also highly "political", where various groups may have their own agenda or may form coalitions in which the balance of power is crucial.
I would look forward to talking about these issues and the sincere need for increased tribal community participation in tribal architecture and planning projects such as the proposed cultural center in downtown Spokane.
Shawn Brigman, Spokane Tribal Membe

Posted by spokandnboy on 09/19/2010 at 4:41 PM

Re: “Return of Garry

Tokenism Participation & Bogus Empowerment: Chief Garry Monument Project


In the context of the Chief Garry proposals over the last year, one could argue that much of the Tribal Urban Planning & Design that has been initiated or carried out has been based solely in a Western/Anglo planning framework that is often top-down in nature. In this scenario, the planning involves only a small section of the tribal community, usually political elites or leaders such as tribal councilmen. Traditional bottom-up tribal planning genuinely involves the input of the whole tribal community including elders, women, college graduates, youth, and tribal members with disabilities.


Tokenism Participation occurs when the tribal community involvement is really just a kind of ritual therapy or lip service, when in fact the tribal political elites really have the power, influence, and control all along to steer the project in the image of the tribal elites. This type of tribal planning just goes through the motions in a top-down hierarchy with only token consultation of the community.


 


Bogus Empowerment occurs when tribal elites let the tribal community think they have a voice and the ability to influence outcomes when in reality the tribal community does not have this influence. An individual, elected council or interest group makes the decisions.


Unfortunately, people with the power and resources to stop this problem, benefit from the social organization and resource distribution that keeps them in power, and so maintain these patterns through control over the selection of tribal elites and socialization of both elites and nonelites.


Furthermore, a major obstacle to more inclusive representation in the Chief Garry planning process is the popular belief that public participation may be viewed as unnecessary, unwieldy, time consuming, and an idealistic dream. The planning process is also highly "political", where various groups may have their own agenda or may form coalitions in which the balance of power is crucial.


Shawn Brigman, Spokan Tribal Membe

Posted by spokandnboy on 04/23/2010 at 4:39 PM

Re: “Return of Garry


Tokenism Participation & Bogus Empowerment: Chief Garry Monument Project


In the context of the Chief Garry monument proposals over the last year, one could argue that much of the Tribal Urban Planning & Design that has been initiated or carried out has been based on a Western/Anglo planning framework that is often top-down in nature. In this scenario, the planning involves only a small section of the tribal community, usually political elites or leaders such as tribal councilmen and their family coalitions. Traditional bottom-up tribal planning genuinely involves the input of the whole tribal community including elders, women, college graduates, youth, and tribal members with disabilities.


Tokenism Participation occurs when the tribal community involvement is really just a kind of ritual therapy or lip service, when in fact the tribal political elites really have the power, influence, and control all along to steer the project in the image of the tribal elites. This type of tribal planning just goes through the motions in a top-down hierarchy with only token consultation of the community.


 


Bogus Empowerment occurs when tribal elites let the tribal community think they have a voice and the ability to influence outcomes in the Chief Garry project, when in reality the tribal community does not have this influence. An individual, elected tribal council or interest group makes the decisions.


Unfortunately, people with the power and resources to stop this problem, benefit from the social organization and resource distribution that keeps them in power, and so maintain these patterns through control over the selection of tribal elites and socialization of both elites and nonelites.


Furthermore, a major obstacle to more inclusive representation in the Chief Garry planning process is the popular belief that public participation may be viewed as unnecessary, unwieldy, time consuming, and an idealistic dream. The planning process is also highly "political", where various groups may have their own agenda or may form coalitions in which the balance of power is crucial.


Shawn Brigman, Spokan Tribal Membe


Posted by spokandnboy on 04/23/2010 at 4:36 PM

Indigenous Urban Planning & Development as a "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" (Paulo Friere 2007, p. 44-50):

In order for this [Architectural] struggle to have meaning, the oppressed must not become in turn oppressors of the oppressors, but rather restorers of the [Architectural] humanity of both. So that through transforming action they can create a new [Architectural] situation, one which makes possible the pursuit of a fuller humanity. Although the situation of oppression is a dehumanized and dehumanizing totality affecting both the oppressors and those whom they oppress, it is the oppressed who must, from their stifled humanity, wage for both the struggle for a fuller humanity. The oppressor, who is himself dehumanized because he dehumanizes others, is unable to lead this struggle.

However, the oppressed, who have adapted to the structure of [Architectural] domination in which they are immersed, and have become resigned to it, are inhibited from waging the struggle for [Architectural] freedom so long as they feel incapable of running the risks it requires. Moreover, their struggle for freedom threatens not only the oppressor, but also their own oppressed comrades who are fearful of still greater repression. When they discover within themselves the yearning to be [Architecturally] free, they perceive that this yearning can be transformed into reality only when the same yearning is aroused in their comrades. They discover that without [Architectural] freedom they cannot exist authentically.

Pedagogy of the oppressed must be forged with, not for the oppressed in the incessant struggle to regain their [Architectural] humanity. This pedagogy makes oppression and its causes, objects of reflection and from that reflection will come their necessary engagement in the struggle for their liberation. In the struggle this pedagogy will be made and remade. Liberation is a childbirth and a painful one. The man or woman [and Architecture] who emerges is a new person, no longer oppressor nor longer oppressed, but human in the process of achieving [Architectural] freedom.

Posted by spokandnboy on 04/16/2010 at 9:52 AM

Re: “Return of Garry

Totem Pole Coastal Indian Aesthetic in the heart of the Plateau Culture Area. This has never made sense to me. Perhaps looking at who was in control of the planning can shed light on this phenomenon.
An important aspect of culture, both for the Indigenous host community and the tourism industry, is the quality and uniqueness of local architecture, historical buildings, and monuments. These inanimate objects reflect the history of the hosts, and are a major tourist attraction. However, any substantative reflection of the 8,000 year place attachment of the Spokane Tribe of Indians is absent from the built environment of the modern day city of Spokane on every level, except for the name that bears the tribal name. Are the local indigenous tribes in the Spokane, Washington region still being forced to maintain someone else’s Architectural heritage (non-indigenous) at a cost to them selves? Where’s the Architectural or Urban Design & Planning elements, for indigenous people to substantively identify with as fully realized human beings on their traditional homeland in the 8,000 year old city of Spokane, Washington?

Posted by spokandnboy on 04/15/2010 at 12:37 PM

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