Kelly Rae Mathews 
Member since Feb 23, 2014


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Recent Comments

Re: “The ABCs of R-A-C-E

I would hope that with the adaptation of the common core curriculum, the new text books adapted by local school districts will prepare our children and all of us who are living here, as, Ms. Dolezal writes, for the "globalized, intercultural, multilingual world they will live and work in." Because, right now, Spokane doesn't seem ready for that. I am ashamed to see a teacher of all people making the comments I read on this board. We need Ms. Dolezal here, helping us to open our eyes to making Spokane more successful over all. Isn't that what we want? A better future for ourselves and our children? To me that means one where the *least* we can do is teach our children some manners, like how not to stare and how to interact with other children with grace. Do we want Spokane to open up to the rest of the world and have a better economic future? Then we need to move forward with grace instead of acting like children ourselves, by throwing the equivalent of adult temper tantrums. People need to stop waving their metaphorical fists around and actually listen and put themselves in the shoes Ms. Dolezal's asking us to wear for moment. As far as I know, that's the Christian thing to do.

3 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Kelly Rae Mathews on 09/17/2014 at 2:07 PM

Re: “How escapism, white privilege and warm fuzzies are destroying the social justice movement

I do not get the idea Ms. Dolezal is attacking individual people's rights to psychological well-being and health, hugs and oxytocins, vis-a-vis warm fuzzies. Nor is she "vilifying" white people by describing quite simply the events which have happened and history itself. Rather, I think she is rather attacking the shallow perpetuation of, as so well put in the popular series the Hunger Games, bread and the circus -- entertainment and distraction from the real problems in our world. The problems which preclude the psychological, and physical health and safety of Ms. Dolezal and her children that she and her family deserve. How can we enjoy warm fuzzies and animal cuteness pictures in the face of all the work that needs to be done? To personally attack Ms. Dolezal herself through her son is bullying and harassment in my book. Ms. Dolezal and her children being the minority, are few and we the white people, the many. This means, we need to step back. We need to check our privilege. If our feelings are hurt or we feel fear, it's time to do some actual research. Also, imagine the amount of fear she feels. That's what's here in Ms. Dolezal's courageously written article. A cry for help for all of us to stop being caught up in patterns that are tearing apart a beautiful future for all of humanity. To listen to those who are being hurt and are in pain and losing loved ones because of the violence experienced because of racism. For those who wonder what white privilege is, try reading this article as well, on explaining privilege to broke white people for starters. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gina-crosley…

15 likes, 29 dislikes
Posted by Kelly Rae Mathews on 09/04/2014 at 2:56 PM

Re: “A Hate/Love Relationship

p.s. I am responding to the commentators on this thread as well as the article. And please, please, those who only see Spokane in narrow ways, try looking on Youtube or looking up what the art scene here in Spokane is, (First Friday, terrain, -- local poet, the intelligent and beautiful Brooke Matson will be reading this Wednesday free at Gonzaga -- and so much more!) the music, too. I hope you'll be happily surprised, like discovering a treasure and seeing Spokane in a whole new beautiful perspective outside of what is known. And The article says love hate relationship. The author has chosen to commit to building something here in Spokane inspite of personal conflict with it. I respect the strength of character that takes, and the strength and fortitude and forthrightness and bravery to write any of what the writer says because it is not entirely positive. Good writing is more than fluffy beams. It makes you think. It rouses up your emotions. Seems the writer has been fairly successful in this endeavor.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Kelly Rae Mathews on 03/23/2014 at 10:10 PM

Re: “A Hate/Love Relationship

An interesting combination of ideas as to what constitutes the "identity" of Spokane as a city seems to be a common theme.

Spokane, though, has many identities. It is changing in different ways.

Spokane is more than fishing, and hunting. Please open your eyes.

As to the transit center, I have yet to hear any good recommendations of where to put it besides where it is now. Also, having a centrally located transit center has worked for other cities. Part of the transit center issue and the homeless in Spokane is it is forcing people to look at things that certain populations of Spokane typically likes to pretend don't even exist. Now it's right in everyone's view.

They can't say "Oh, Spokane has no problems" anymore. Which is good, it's time to confront reality.

What happened to appreciating a little liveliness and eccentricity in a city that is part of its uniqueness?

Guess what Spokane, you're weird and eccentric and we love you, anyway, a lot of us.

However, I acknowledge how hard it is to do anything here without connections if you didn't grow up here or aren't part of a church. I acknowledge how hard it is if you're an expressive person or you're an artist.
Or you're a colorful, vibrant person.

If you want to slap the assertions this intrepid reporter is making down, find better ways of doing it than to hide under the blanket of Weech isn't Spokanice enough.

How about this. Spokane is growing up. These are growing pains.

How about is high time for acknowledging the pain of the writer of the article, the grief of not just Weech, but all those she is representing in this article.
And I thank at least one person who intelligently argued their points for doing so in that way, and acknowledging it.
How about this, too, though.
Everyone here is at a marvelous time, of change, when Spokane is transforming into a new identity, and some people so caught up in their day to day aren't even aware and are totally out of the loop. I not only invite each person naying this article to come down out of their tower, out of their comfort zone and see how the other half lives, I dare you to be brave and come take a look at local art, poetry, film and everything simply amazing that is happening. Feel alive in a whole new way.

Just because Spokane is at 500,000 or so population doesn't mean it can't support the arts. It's about raising an awareness and campaigning to make what is local "cool" in the eyes of those who live here.
I hear people having pride here, but they don't rake pride in the creativity without going to see it.

And no one is ever going to accuse y'all of being California, Seattle, or Portland.

Spokane does bleed out young talent and brains. That means it loses a huge part of the soul of this city.

How can you all let that happen!

I say you need to put your pride aside and acknowledge a bit of truth here.

Luke Baumgartner's previous article in the Inlander talked about the creative economy. There are a lot of people who want an innovative economy and not jut a care based one for retired people. But something else Spokane wants that it thinks a care-industry based economy offers for the next 20 or 30 years is stability and security.

Well. It's not really long-term security if it's an industry that's based on care for retirees and boomers. Long-term security will come from investing in creative innovations that are locally sourced from people here that spawn the next generation.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Kelly Rae Mathews on 03/23/2014 at 9:46 PM

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