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by KELLY McCRILLIS & r & Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows


by J.K. Rowling


& lt;span class= "dropcap " & A & lt;/span & fter hours spent reading what seemed like endless text, I have become content. The Deathly Hallows, not to mention the cliffhanging plot elements J.K. Rowing has managed to connect throughout each Harry Potter book, have all become clear as Veritaserum (a truth potion).





Rowling continues to impress. The amount of plot and character development she incorporates into her final installment confirms her as an improved author. From the beginning, Rowling thrusts the reader into the middle of an already blood-soaked struggle. After finishing the first chapter, it is almost hard to believe that this series started off as a children's story, though it's not in short supply of friendship morals.





Thrillingly grave material sparks the storyline. Much of this dwells upon Harry's ability to cope with being an underage leader/symbol of the resistance against the rising powers of Voldemort. Simultaneously, he searches for the three remaining parts of Voldemort's soul (Horcruxes, not easily attained), and also is forced to acknowledge the fact that his friends are dying all around him, because of him and for him.





While at times the narrative becomes tragic, it borders on becoming stale early in the quest. Just when Rowling has put readers through as much as they can possibly take of arguments among Harry, Ron, and Hermione and a standstill plotline, she creates an adventure worth reading. Voldemort is hot on the troupe's trail, and magical quests (including a trip back to Hogwarts) are braved through sheer will and coming-of-age determination. Those pertinent and necessary questions such as "Is Snape good or evil?" and "Will Harry die?" are so intricately detailed in explanation that the reader will be satisfied no matter the answers.





Interesting connections to social status, racism, and the gray area between good and evil are intermingled with both the Wizarding society and the Muggles'. The exquisitely drawn fight scenes are satisfying, especially the final inevitable bout between the Dark Lord and the Boy Who Lived. Harry's change from selfish, disinclined martyr, to willing hero, to an undoubtedly noble wizard is both sweet and intricate.





Rowling closes with an epic chronicle, filled with unforgettable characters, legends, and one of the more detailed plotlines produced in recent literature. As Harry would say, mischief managed.

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