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by Inlander Staff


Little House in the Rockies -- For those of us growing up on a steady diet of Little House on the Prairie, the chance to go back in time and experience the heartwarming and homespun fun of life on the American frontier seems tempting. But it wasn't all calico poke bonnets, church socials and sweaty Michael Landon -- pioneer life was, well, hard.


Beginning next Monday night, KSPS brings us The Frontier House, a six-part series from the producers of The 1900 House. Three modern families get a crash course in pioneer survival, and then make the trek to Montana via covered wagon. Once there, they build their own log cabins, learn how to live without running water, electricity or any other modern conveniences. They face nature in the form of freak snowstorms, bears and uncooperative crops and livestock.


If Survivor and its beautiful contestants is a little too hokey for you, check out The Frontier House, which debuts on Channel 7, Monday, April 29, at 8 pm. For more, check out the PBS Web site: www.pbs.org/wnet/frontierhouse.





Catch a Rising Star -- Tait Hunter is a girl on a mission. The eight-year-old Scottish Highland dancer has only been taking dance classes for about 18 months, but she's already netted three trophies. In October, Hunter and five other students from Kelly's Dance Academy will fly down to Hollywood to participate in the World Championship of Performing Arts, which is attended by casting directors, producers and other show business industry insiders, as well as performing delegates from all over the world. For a sneak preview of their World Championship show, Hunter and her fellow dancers will be performing at the Met on Thursday, May 2 in a fundraising event for their October trip to Hollywood. For ticket information, call 325-SEAT.





A Better Brew? -- Our friends over at Far West Billiards think they've got something big -- cask beer. Cask beer? you ask. "It's beer that has been conditioned (i.e., finished and slightly carbonated) in the cask from which it is served using the natural action of the remaining yeast in suspension in the beer," explains Far West owner Andrew Sackville-West. What does this mean to you, the beer drinker? It's a little fizzier, and it's served warm, just the way our colonial forefathers liked it. They plan to tap a new cask beer every Thursday afternoon and serve it until it's all gone, which means, in Andrew's succinct words, "get down and get it while it's tepid."





Give us your buzz and we'll share it across the land. Write us at [email protected]

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