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by Inlander Staff


Add It To Your List -- If you're still picking through last week's Fall Arts Preview issue for stuff to do and places to go, add the Japanese Cultural Center at Mukogawa Fort Wright Institute to your list. The JCC has a cool new "Japanese Wedding" exhibit, which features traditional engagement gifts and the gorgeous wedding overcoat, the uchikake. If you've never been to the center before, it's definitely worth a visit. And be sure to visit the Fort Wright Commons, the Downtown Skywalk and the Bank of America downtown on Nov. 3 for Bunka no Hi Culture Day, which features ikebana, calligraphy and other Japanese activities.





Piece by Piece -- Director Kim Roberts guides a cast of seven in Quilters, the 1982 musical about pioneer women. Each block of the quilt that they create commemorates a significant event in their lives, such as surviving a harsh winter or a prairie fire. Turns out that the trials faced by women on the frontier -- courtship, childbirth, old age, death -- have a universal resonance. CenterStage offers this musical dinner theater experience to you, along with the cuisine of Chef Kile Tansy, through Oct. 17.





Power to the People -- Running on barely enough wattage to run an Easy Bake Oven, KYRS Thin Air Radio has managed -- within their not-quite-a-year of operation -- to nevertheless change the face of radio as we know it. No longer prisoner to endless playlists of Sheryl Crow, Dave Matthews Band or Matchbox Twenty, we now hear things never before heard on local airwaves thanks to locally produced shows like "Random Access," "Jazz and Then Some," "Vinyl Hour" and "The Edge."


Now KYRS is part of a full-length documentary on low-power radio stations airing on NBC (Spokane Ch. 6) this weekend. "LPFM: The People's Choice" profiles similar community radio stations across the country and includes interviews with local KYRS staffers and volunteers.


The time slot (12:05 am on Sunday, Sept. 26) leaves a lot to be desired, but we're still jacked to see the hardworking folks at KYRS get some much-deserved publicity.





Burning to Read -- With Banned Books Week right around the corner, we thought it would be a good time to recommend a few of our favorite titles -- books that somebody, somewhere decided ought to be pulled from the shelves of local libraries. The American Library Association has a list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged books, which includes To Kill a Mockingbird, Slaughterhouse Five, A Catcher in the Rye and even James and the Giant Peach. So this week, exercise your freedom to read a book somebody wanted to ban.





Publication date: 09/23/04

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