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by Inlander Staff


Cinema Judaica -- According to legend, the 1933 song "Gloomy Sunday" was so successfully melancholy that over the years it's driven dozens of listeners (and reputedly its own composer) to suicide. Inspired by the true story of the "Hungarian suicide song," Gloomy Sunday, the film, is a sweeping melodrama that sold out in less than five minutes at the 2004 Toronto Jewish Film Festival. And this weekend, you can see it at the Met along with two other notable films -- Emma Goldman: An Exceedingly Dangerous Woman and My Architect -- as part of the Jewish Film Festival. Emma Goldman is exactly what you'd expect -- the documented life and times of one of the 20th century's finest anarchists. My Architect is the haunting story of one man's investigation of his own father, the renowned architect and bon vivant Louis Kahn. All three films received significant buzz this year, and the Met is to be applauded for bringing them to Spokane audiences. A pass to all three movies is $15; single movie tickets can be purchased for $7.





War Stories -- We're pleased to announce that one-time Inlander contributor Andrea Palpant is premiering her first documentary, In Time of War, Saturday night at Whitworth. Featuring exclusive interviews with Japanese-Americans in the Pacific Northwest, In Time of War tells the varied stories of Japanese Americans who were evacuated, incarcerated in internment camps, or joined military service. The film was funded in part by a grant from the Washington Civil Liberties Public Education Program and is tentatively scheduled to air on KSPS in December. The film shows at Whitworth's Weyerhauser Hall at 5 pm Saturday, and will include a discussion afterwards with Palpant, Whitworth history professor Dale Soden and Whitworth alum Rose Sliger. Call 777-4580.





Buy-Curious? -- "What would it mean to have a visible gay community in Spokane?" That's the question that's being asked by the Inland Northwest Business Alliance (INBA), which offers an Oct. 2 workshop with Candace Gingrich of the Human Rights Campaign. The INBA has spent the past 14 months looking at how a visible gay community benefits Spokane -- and Spokane business -- as a whole. Working from ideas originally established by "Creative Class" guru Richard Florida, INBA hopes to discover how "Tolerance" will in turn invite "Talent" and "Technology" -- the three Ts -- to the region. In addition to Gingrich's keynote address "Building a Community, Building a Vision," the bipartisan event will also include information on voter registration and the winners of this year's Pride Foundation Awards. This event is free. For more info, visit the Web site: inbaspokane.org or call: 455-3699.





Publication date: 09/30/04

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