Size Matters

Size Matters

Class size isn't a silver bullet, but it will help
Earlier this month, Washington voters approved a mandate on smaller class sizes by a tiny margin. When an initiative campaign like this one gathers sufficient interest to reach the ballot, it's safe to say that the public is both interested in the policy and dissatisfied with current representatives' ability to address the issue adequately.

Spilled Votes

One last look at the conservative domination of the Idaho elections earlier this month
OUCH! It's hard, very hard, being a Democrat in Idaho.

Making Spokane Pop

Publisher's Note
I found Jerry Schmidt over by the Clock Tower, setting up lights in the near-freezing rain for his latest effort, the Winter Glow Spectacular. Somebody had remarked to him earlier, "Wow, you actually put up the lights, too?"

Who's In Charge?

Scott Chesney's removal underlines confusion in our strong mayor system; here's what the city charter says
The curtain opens exposing the Wizard, revealing him as not the "Great and Terrible Oz," but rather just a little old man. Dorothy, dismayed, says: "Oh, you're a very bad man!" To which the Wizard replies, "No, my dear. I'm a very good man. I'm just a very bad wizard."

From Pain To Progress

Publisher's Note
"Empathy." If I boil down, into one word, the past year's worth of journalism we've devoted to our "State of Mind" series, that's it.

Republicans' Last, Best Chance

Will they take the presidency in 2016 or lose it all?
Earlier this month, Republicans swept into office with their largest majorities in Congress since 1928. They have unprecedented power in state legislatures across the country and control most of the nation's governorships.

Exporting Our Values

The next generation of American leaders needs to find common ground with our allies around the world
Florence, Italy, is a magical place with centuries of rich history. It offers foods that delight the soul and vistas that stir emotions.

Still on Probation

Publisher's Note
The political history of Spokane is like Groundhog Day. Starting in the 1890s, our little boomtown had neighborhood representatives and a full-time mayor.

Heating Up

Racial tensions grow from Ferguson to Spokane as protesters, parents and students demand justice
"It's a high-stress, low-trust environment," says Johnetta Elzie, a protester awaiting the grand jury decision this week related to a white Ferguson police officer who killed an unarmed black teenager. What's shocking is that her words, quoted in USA Today, precisely describe the feeling 1,860 miles away from Ferguson, in Spokane's Davenport Hotel last Saturday.

Doctor's Orders

For a life well lived, along with his huge impact on saving our Spokane River Gorge, John Moyer's name needs to be remembered
Last June, I seconded the growing sentiment that John Moyer be nominated to have the plaza above Huntington Park named after him. I cited his medical career and his efforts to help kill the Lincoln Street Bridge project.

Comparing Notes

Publisher's Note
A couple of weeks back I made a trip down to Colorado Springs, where leaders from free urban weeklies from around the country gathered to share ideas and commiserate about the state of our business. I've gone to a lot of these events, and I always think back to when I was just trying to soak it all in and get some advice from the papers that were doing it right — Willamette Week in Portland, the San Francisco Bay Guardian.

On Trust

I thought I knew what the word meant. Two weeks ago, I realized I'd had no clue
I was married recently.

Truth Scarier than Fiction

As our fears become real, will we become the heroes we need?
A disembodied voice, footsteps in an empty house, inexplicable coincidence, omens of doom and a feeling that something has gone horribly wrong. These hallmarks of the horror genre have likely kept you up at night and kept you coming back for more.

Competition is Healthy

Idaho ballots offer plenty of the same old, same old, but there are a few great options if you're looking for change
F or 20 long years, the Idaho Legislature and Governor's office have been under one-party rule — Republican. Since 2006, all the statewide elected officials have also been elected under the brand name of the elephant.

Epic Fail on Ebola

Publisher's Note
T he ebola outbreak in the United States over the past several weeks has not been our finest moment. First, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas sent Liberian Thomas Duncan home from the ER when he complained of ebola symptoms.

The Real Me

Guest Commentary
I read with bemusement Robert Herold's acerbic column accusing me of being vague about my background. ("Inferences Left Hanging," 10/23/14.)

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Recent Comments

  • Re: Who's In Charge?

    • Seriously? The former planning director was all talk. As much as people wanted to believe…

    • on November 22, 2014
  • Re: What We Aren't

    • i am trying to love it. i want to buy a home here and fight…

    • on November 22, 2014
  • Re: Republicans' Last, Best Chance

    • The Republicans' landmark victories this month meant nothing and they must change their principles immediately…

    • on November 21, 2014
  • Re: Heating Up

    • For sake of discussion here I am going to state my race; negro/black(originally from Caribbean…

    • on November 18, 2014
  • Re: Still on Probation

    • Mr. Chesney can voluntarily waive any confidentiality surrounding his termination. Perhaps the Inlander can ask…

    • on November 13, 2014
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    • Nov 12, 2014
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