Pin It
Favorite

Local News Briefs 

by Pia K. Hansen


World AIDS Day -- SPOKANE -- Saturday, Dec. 1, is World AIDS Day, and local activists from Planned Parenthood, the Spokane AIDS Network and other groups are inviting the public to an afternoon observance. Janine Ballou, case manager at the Spokane AIDS Network, says activists will gather at the Spokane Transit Plaza at 701 W. Riverside starting at 3 pm, when several pianists and violinists will play. At 5:30, several speakers will take the podium, including an HIV-positive man and Lynn Everson, a longtime activist for the disenfranchised. After those activities will come a candle lighting and vigil.


"The candles represent the lives lost," says Ballou. "We're doing an observance and memorial to the lives that have been lost to AIDS since the epidemic began 20 years ago."


Organizers will hand out free candles to those attending the demonstration, which will include (weather permitting) a walk around the transit plaza block. The plaza was chosen as a place where the observance will draw public attention, says Ballou.


The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that perhaps 800,000 Americans live with HIV and AIDS. Globally, the United Nations believes that 36 million people have the disease today.





Close elections settled -- SPOKANE -- It could have been a closer race, but not by much. Of the 16,270 votes cast for the Spokane District Two city council seat in November's election, Dennis Hession won by a margin of just 50.


That was the certified result, according to the county's elections officers. (A state-mandated machine recount, held Tuesday evening after the Inlander went to press, was not expected to change the outcome.)


Hession beat Dean Lynch, the sitting councilman, 8,160 votes to 8,110. District Two mainly covers Spokane's South Hill.


The two weeks of uncertainty were difficult, Hession says. And while the narrow margin means his mandate is less than overwhelming, Hession says it won't change the way he is approaching the job.


"I made a commitment to change the atmosphere in the council as best I could, and I will," he says. The Spokane council has serious public policy issues to address like poverty and economic development, but "I think there are some housekeeping things that need to be addressed first -- I mean, the way the council is treating each other and treating the mayor."


The Hession-Lynch race was not the only surprise. It looked like James Carlson had the mayor's race for Waverly (population 125) sewn up. He was the only person listed on the ballot for that town in Spokane County's southeast corner. But write-in candidate Bill Tensfeld won after elections officials counted the ballots -- all 46 of them. Tensfeld won 25 to 21.


"I was drafted," says Tensfeld, 64, who retired from driving truck and working at the local fertilizer plant. "If that's what they want, I'll do it."


Tensfeld is fire chief for the local fire district, and he and Carlson respond to fires and accidents together. Tensfeld says that as mayor he'll pursue the town's major projects already underway, including the rebuilding of Main Street.


"It'll stay the same," he says, "just new faces."
  • Pin It

Latest in Comment

  • Class Act
  • Class Act

    Seeing through money differences can build relationships focused on fairness
    • Sep 22, 2016
  • Don's Ultimate Con
  • Don's Ultimate Con

    Trail Mix: Trump's birther problems and Johnson's polls
    • Sep 22, 2016
  • Transparent Motives
  • Transparent Motives

    One candidate's an open book; the other is shrouded in secrecy. Guess which one isn't transparent enough
    • Sep 22, 2016
  • More »

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Today | Wed | Thu | Fri | Sat | Sun | Mon
Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science

Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science @ Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 6

All of today's events | Staff Picks

More by Pia K. Hansen

  • Third Time's a Charm?

    There are 234 miles of arterials and 612 miles of residential streets in Spokane, and, yes, most of them are slowly crumbling away under cars, buses and trucks every day. By the latest estimate, the city needs about $200 million to fix th
    • May 14, 2004
  • Spokane, We Have Liftoff...

    When the first LaunchPad event was held at the Holley Mason Building back in February 2001, Spokane got quite a wake-up call. Not only was the place decked out with red carpet runners and lights illuminating the fa & ccedil;ade of the newly renova
    • May 14, 2004
  • Time to Pay the Fare

    On Sunday, thousands of runners took the bus to get to the start of Bloomsday. A $1 sticker guaranteed a ride to and from outlying parking areas and a chance to mingle with fellow Bloomies. Yet taking the bus downtown may not be an option
    • May 6, 2004
  • More »

Most Commented On

  • To Kill the Black Snake

    Historic all-tribes protest at Standing Rock is meant to stop the destruction of the earth for all
    • Sep 8, 2016
  • Murrow's Nightmare

    Debate moderators need to be much more than an onstage prop to make our democracy work
    • Sep 15, 2016
  • More »

Top Tags in
News & Comment

election 2016


trail mix


Briefs


green zone


marijuana


Readers also liked…

  • To Kill the Black Snake
  • To Kill the Black Snake

    Historic all-tribes protest at Standing Rock is meant to stop the destruction of the earth for all
    • Sep 8, 2016
  • Wages or Wellness?
  • Wages or Wellness?

    Why paid sick leave is good for everyone
    • Mar 4, 2015

© 2016 Inlander
Website powered by Foundation