Pin It
Favorite

Quotes & amp;amp; Notes 

by Inlander Staff


Greening Idaho --It's a long way to springtime, but Idaho might be greening up anyway. The Idaho Green Party has been gathering signatures (it needs at least 10,000) to get on the official Idaho state ballot for primary elections.


"Our goal is to [be ready] by March," says Robert McMinn, spokesman for the Idaho Green Party. "The mandate for the statewide entity is to encourage different groups to start up."


Both Ada and Bonner counties have active Green Party chapters, and on Dec. 11, McMinn will head to Coeur d'Alene for the first Kootenai County Green Party meeting. Coeur d'Alene resident Rebecca McNeill is heading efforts to start the Kootenai County chapter.


"The Green Party really focuses on being involved locally. Even if people just have questions about the Green Party, they're welcome to attend this meeting," McNeill says.


Call (208) 651-0797 for details.





Turnout Totals -- Many have wondered why the last two mayors of Spokane have served just three years. John Talbott and John Powers each have seemingly been shortchanged. The reason is that the state mandates that mayoral races must be held in off-years from congressional races and other national offices. Since the strong mayor system passed in 1999, Talbott and Powers' tenures were shortened to get the office back on the state's track. The reason the state prefers the off-years is that voting experts believe crowded ballots lead to problems: Candidates at the bottom of the ballot often don't get votes. (Apparently, voters run out of steam halfway through the ballot.) So mayoral candidates could get shortchanged on a crowded ballot.


Sounds a little iffy to us; by voting for mayors in off-years, the state seems to be mandating lower voter turnouts. This is all a sad comment on the state of our "democracy," because the voters are really the problem. But at least if mayoral races were, say, in presidential years, we'd have a chance at bigger turnouts, thereby creating more of a mandate for the city's leader.


According to the Spokane County Elections Office, the final turnout from last month's general election was about 46 percent, countywide. That's not 46 percent of the total population; no, of all the people registered to vote in Spokane County, fewer than half bothered to do so. And this in an era when you can vote by mail!


But in 2000, when the mayoral race coincided with the presidential race and the governor's race, 76 percent turned out. In the general elections of 1998 and 2002 -- years with congressional races -- the turnout was 59 percent. In 2001, it was 43 percent.


If we're this lame at voting, perhaps we should only hold elections every two years: It would be cheaper, and we'd get better turnouts.





Publication date: 12/18/03
  • Pin It

Latest in Comment

  • Beware, Be Ready
  • Beware, Be Ready

    Simple, sensible precautions can make all the difference when "the big one" hits
    • Jul 22, 2015
  • The Trumpenstein Monster
  • The Trumpenstein Monster

    Publisher's Note
    • Jul 22, 2015
  • Who Do You Trust?
  • Who Do You Trust?

    Republicans are howling about the Iran nuclear treaty, but after a century of bad advice, should we even listen?
    • Jul 22, 2015
  • More »

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Today | Wed | Thu | Fri | Sat | Sun | Mon
Moscow ArtWalk 2015

Moscow ArtWalk 2015 @ Downtown Moscow

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays. Continues through Aug. 31

All of today's events | Staff Picks

More by Inlander Staff

Most Commented On

  • Patrolling While Black

    Gordon Grant's nearly 30 years as a Spokane cop have been affected by race, but that's not the whole story
    • Jul 8, 2015
  • Rushing's Rant

    The Airway Heights City Council has asked the mayor to resign after posting a racist Facebook message
    • Jul 15, 2015
  • More »

© 2015 Inlander
Website powered by Foundation