Pin It
Favorite

Stop the Presses 

The Spokesman's future as a daily. Plus, laptops heading to the classroom.

click to enlarge art18063.jpg
services.

Daily to Semi-Weekly?

The American daily newspaper took one step closer to the grave last month when the New Orleans Times-Picayune announced that it, along with three other papers in the Southeast, would start publishing three days a week.

So, what about the Spokesman-Review, where circulation has been steadily declining?

“There is absolutely no discussion at all of changing our delivery cycle,” says Dan Johnson, director of sales and marketing for the Spokesman. “Can I say that will never happen? I don’t know. Right now, there are no plans.”

However, publisher Stacey Cowles predicted in a September Huffington Post article that the paper wouldn’t be a daily for much longer, eventually only printing three times a week.

Meanwhile, the paper is rolling out new subscription plans that take effect in July. The cheapest option includes only digital access to the paper and its website, while getting the printed daily paper will cost $192 a year.

“The plan we have is to do everything we can to deliver a seven-day cycle,” Johnson says. (Chris Stein)

In The Know

The Spokane Police Department has been informed about a federal civil rights ruling that found discrimination in a case where law enforcement used the U.S. Border Patrol for translation assistance.

“Within an hour of the decision coming out, it was in the hands of the police chief and senior command folks” at the department, according to Spokane City Attorney Nancy Isserlis.

The decision doesn’t specifically related to the city, and Isserlis couldn’t say if the police department — which has sometimes used Border Patrol agents for translation help — has taken any action from the ruling.

The civil rights office of the U.S. Department of Agriculture ruled last week that the U.S. Forest Service discriminated against a Hispanic couple by calling the U.S. Border Patrol for “translation assistance.”

The incident occurred last May on the Olympic Peninsula when a Forest Service officer and a Border Patrol agent converged on the couple. When the Border Patrol agent arrived, the couple, unnamed in the proceedings, fled their car. The man died trying to cross a river. The woman, who filed the complaint, was detained and later released. (Joe O'Sullivan)

Experimental Technology

In the fall of 2013, Idaho will finally officially launch the Laptop-For-Every-Student phase of its controversial “Students Come First” program. But in the first year, only one-third of the students will actually receive laptops.

In North Idaho, the Lakeside and Coeur d’Alene school districts, and Coeur d’Alene Charter students, will be among that first third.

Melissa McGrath, spokeswoman for the Idaho Department of Education, explains that districts already proficient with using technology and offering online classes were the most likely to get the chance to use the laptops first.

“Every school will decide how to use those devices,” McGrath says. “For instance, some school districts may decide to allow the students to take the devices home, others may not. It’s really going to depend.”

Meanwhile, opposition to aspects of Idaho’s reform continues, especially with regard to reforms curtailing the power of teachers unions. About half the teachers at a recent Coeur d’Alene school board meeting wore black to show support for the Coeur d’Alene Education Association. (Daniel Walters)

  • Pin It

Speaking of...

Latest in News

  • When a Horse Isn't a Horse
  • When a Horse Isn't a Horse

    Gambling machines help Idaho's racing industries limp along — but maybe not for long
    • Jan 28, 2015
  • 'The Time Has Come'
  • 'The Time Has Come'

    Idaho considers protections for sexual orientation; plus, a new Spokane City Council candidate emerges
    • Jan 28, 2015
  • Freeze Frame
  • Freeze Frame

    Some want to limit the release of footage from police body cameras. What would that mean for Spokane?
    • Jan 28, 2015
  • More »

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Today | Thu | Fri | Sat | Sun | Mon | Tue

All of today's events | Staff Picks

More by Daniel Walters

  • When a Horse Isn't a Horse
  • When a Horse Isn't a Horse

    Gambling machines help Idaho's racing industries limp along — but maybe not for long
    • Jan 28, 2015
  • 'The Time Has Come'
  • 'The Time Has Come'

    Idaho considers protections for sexual orientation; plus, a new Spokane City Council candidate emerges
    • Jan 28, 2015
  • More »

More by Joe O'Sullivan

  • R.I.P. Spokane
  • R.I.P. Spokane

    Exploring the Spokane of South Dakota — left for dead long ago
    • Jun 11, 2013
  • Beating On
  • Beating On

    Ska and new wave legends the English Beat land in Spokane
    • Mar 26, 2013
  • Green Water
  • Green Water

    Will Congress say yes to more hydropower?
    • Feb 27, 2013
  • More »

More by Chris Stein

  • Ready for Anything
  • Ready for Anything

    Developing agility may help prevent injury
    • Sep 1, 2012
  • PAML's Next Step
  • PAML's Next Step

    Francisco Velazquez insists on symmetry. Even sitting at a huge table flanked by leather-backed chairs and a jumble of expensive video equipment, he makes sure his Blackberry and iPhone (the former for business, the latter for pleasure) are situated in neat symmetry with each other.
    • Sep 1, 2012
  • Burns Out
  • Burns Out

    As the city scrambles to keep Tim Burns around for a while longer, the police ombudsman says he may leave his post anyway
    • Aug 22, 2012
  • More »

Most Commented On

  • Say 'No' to Fear

    Why Spokane ought to embrace its roots as an immigrant-friendly place
    • Jan 21, 2015
  • Mothers and Leaders

    History often overlooks the women who powered the politics of the civil rights movement
    • Jan 7, 2015
  • More »

© 2015 Inlander
Website powered by Foundation