Pin It
Favorite

Stopping Short 

Spokane City Council shoots down a proposal for neighborhood C.O.P. shops; plus, Washington benefits from the country’s drought

click to enlarge art18218.jpg

ALL ALONE

Using pizza-topping metaphors and a bike helmet as a prop, Spokane Councilman Steve Salvatori Monday defended his proposal to let neighborhood councils use red-light traffic ticket money to build C.O.P. shops.

But the vote failed, 6-1, with Salvatori as the only yes to a plan aimed at bolstering neighborhood responses to crime.

Salvatori noted the plan wouldn’t take money away but would have given neighborhoods more choices than when the program was approved five years ago.

“Do you think the priorities in 2012 might be a little different than in 2007?” Salvatori asked, noting that the city had 25 more police officers before the Great Recession.

“What good is a new sidewalk if a crook uses it to carry your TV off?” he added later.

The Balboa/South Indian Trail neighborhood council originally sought the proposal so it could build a C.O.P. shop, an office staffed by volunteers that doubles as a community police station. But other neighborhood councils disapproved, saying the money — used now for traffic-calming projects — could be opened up for other uses.

Councilman Mike Fagan said he wasn’t a fan of the red-light camera program in general. Said Fagan: “There will be an opportunity for us to discuss subsequent renewal of this program next year.”

— JOE O'SULLIVAN

THE BENEFITS OF DROUGHT

The United States’ biggest drought in half a century may cause food prices to soar and most farmers to struggle. But for some area farmers, it could be a good thing. Washington state has largely dodged the worst of the weather.

“We in the Pacific Northwest had really good soil moisture last fall,” says Glen Squires, CEO of the Washington Grain Commission. That may result in an average harvest, but with the rest of the country struggling, average can be profitable. When corn harvests fail, farmers turn to wheat to feed their livestock, increasing demand.

With just three weeks, he says, the Portland price for soft-white wheat rose from $5.40 to $8.79, ideal for Washington farmers unaffected by drought.

He cautions, however, that the harvest is just beginning. A rainstorm could cause the wheat to develop sprouts, or a heat wave could stump development.

— DANIEL WALTERS

A WHOOP OF A SUMMER

Despite a statewide epidemic, whooping cough vaccination rates aren’t where they need to be in Spokane.

“Uptake is nowhere near where we would like to see it,” says Kim Papich, public information officer with the Spokane Regional Health District.

Washington Gov. Christine Gregoire declared an epidemic of whooping cough in May, and the Health District received about 2,000 whooping cough vaccines to distribute to people without insurance, Papich says.

“A lot of people assumed [that] once school was out and once kids weren’t close to each other in school, the numbers would drop,” Papich says. “Kind of the opposite has been true.”

Whooping cough is most severe when it afflicts infants. But babies often get it from adults who are un-vaccinated, Papich says, and the Health District estimates only 20 percent of adults are vaccinated in the county.

As of last week, there are 2,883 cases statewide.

— CHRIS STEIN

Tags:

  • Pin It

Latest in News

  • Seven Ways Drought is Impacting the Inland Northwest
  • Seven Ways Drought is Impacting the Inland Northwest

    No, it's not as bad as in California, but drought is taking a hefty toll
    • Jul 29, 2015
  • Hopeless for Heroin
  • Hopeless for Heroin

    As heroin deaths continue to rise in Washington state, what can a parent do to save a child from the depths of addiction?
    • Jul 29, 2015
  • Call Mr. Yuk
  • Call Mr. Yuk

    Gov. Inslee avoids the "poison pill"; plus, pushing back against empty Kickstarter promises
    • Jul 29, 2015
  • More »

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Today | Thu | Fri | Sat | Sun | Mon | Tue
Moscow ArtWalk 2015

Moscow ArtWalk 2015 @ Downtown Moscow

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays. Continues through Aug. 31

All of today's events | Staff Picks

More by Daniel Walters

More by Joe O'Sullivan

  • R.I.P. Spokane
  • R.I.P. Spokane

    Exploring the Spokane of South Dakota — left for dead long ago
    • Jun 11, 2013
  • Beating On
  • Beating On

    Ska and new wave legends the English Beat land in Spokane
    • Mar 26, 2013
  • Green Water
  • Green Water

    Will Congress say yes to more hydropower?
    • Feb 27, 2013
  • More »

More by Chris Stein

  • Ready for Anything
  • Ready for Anything

    Developing agility may help prevent injury
    • Sep 1, 2012
  • PAML's Next Step
  • PAML's Next Step

    Francisco Velazquez insists on symmetry. Even sitting at a huge table flanked by leather-backed chairs and a jumble of expensive video equipment, he makes sure his Blackberry and iPhone (the former for business, the latter for pleasure) are situated in neat symmetry with each other.
    • Sep 1, 2012
  • Burns Out
  • Burns Out

    As the city scrambles to keep Tim Burns around for a while longer, the police ombudsman says he may leave his post anyway
    • Aug 22, 2012
  • More »

Most Commented On

  • Patrolling While Black

    Gordon Grant's nearly 30 years as a Spokane cop have been affected by race, but that's not the whole story
    • Jul 8, 2015
  • Rushing's Rant

    The Airway Heights City Council has asked the mayor to resign after posting a racist Facebook message
    • Jul 15, 2015
  • More »

© 2015 Inlander
Website powered by Foundation