Eggs got some bad press in the '70s and '80s, when really it was probably their typical companions like buttered toast, bacon and other sources of saturated fats that were the problem. Eggs do contain cholesterol, and eating them can raise cholesterol, but for most egg eaters the rise is small and the overall impact can be negligible for several reasons: one, more dietary cholesterol leads to less production of cholesterol by the liver; two, for most who eat eggs, the "good" cholesterol (HDL) goes up more than the "bad" cholesterol (LDL); and three, for those who do get a bump up in LDL, the rise tends to be in the form of the less-dense, better type of LDLs. I think of it as less gooey, and less likely to plug things up. For those without Type 2 diabetes, recent studies suggest that eating up to three eggs a day, is safe.

One of my favorite things about this nearly perfect food is that it can it be prepared in all different tasty types of ways. They can be scrambled, fried, frenched, folded, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, baked and whipped.

While any egg is a rich source of protein and energy-dense fat, the best eggs come from happy hens allowed some room to roam and hunt for worms, grubs and such and who are fed fruits and vegetables in addition to the typical whole-grain fare. The orange, rather than yellow, yolk is a characteristic of eggs from pastured hens and is a result of this nutrient-rich diet. If hens are fed flax seeds as part of their diet, their eggs may even be a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids, a poly-unsaturated fat that offers health benefits to most — lowering triglycerides which in turn reduce the risk of future cardiovascular disease.

Eggs are also high on the satiety index, and low on the glycemic index. In other words, they are a satisfying and filling food to eat for breakfast, helping to keep the hunger inducing hormone ghrelin in check — less ghrelin equals less growlin.'

Full disclosure: I am pretty sure I am addicted to eggs. I have a very close correspondence with my supplier, and I think it is telling that I am unwilling to share my supplier with others, for fear of jeopardizing my supply. But, for those willing to work a little, I will give a hint: I get my supply from the only good watchmaker left in town. I think it is quite appropriate that I obtain this oviparous treasure from a jewelry store.

Makoto Fujimura: Silence – Mysterion @ Jundt Art Museum

Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Jan. 4
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