Catholic Charities set to open new housing for homeless families

click to enlarge The new Gonzaga Family Haven - COURTESY OF CATHOLIC CHARITIES
Courtesy of Catholic Charities
The new Gonzaga Family Haven

Catholic Charities Eastern Washington will open Gonzaga Family Haven permanent supportive housing for 73 families later this month, in partnership with Gonzaga University, Gonzaga Preparatory School and St. Aloysius Parish.

"Families and most importantly, children need a roof over their heads at night before they can think about anything else," Catholic Charities President and CEO Rob McCann says in a news release. "Gonzaga Family Haven will not only help families stabilize their lives but will give them options for a brighter future."

The facility will provide wrap-around services for residents, including case management, connection with medical resources, substance abuse counseling, personal health and wellness classes, adult education, employment readiness, nutrition courses and more.

Students from both Gonzaga and G-Prep will volunteer to help out at the haven.

"Gonzaga University believes in the purpose and power of community, and we are excited to become a part of the Gonzaga Family Haven community," Gonzaga University President Thayne McCulloh says in the announcement. "We are looking forward to offering many of our successful community engagement programs at the Family Haven. These service-learning opportunities, integral to the Jesuit educational model, are strategic and long-term commitments. We believe the Family Haven partnership holds the potential for Spokane to establish a national model of community-driven change."

The new homes at 975 E. North Foothills Drive will be celebrated with a grand opening and blessing from 11 am to 1 pm on March 30. Parking will be limited and you can RSVP at cceasternwa.org/ghf. ♦

Sandpoint 4th of July Celebration @ Downtown Sandpoint

Mon., July 4, 9 a.m.-10 p.m.
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About The Author

Samantha Wohlfeil

Samantha Wohlfeil covers the environment, rural communities and cultural issues for the Inlander. Since joining the paper in 2017, she's reported how the weeks after getting out of prison can be deadly, how some terminally ill Eastern Washington patients have struggled to access lethal medication, and other sensitive...