Epstein wasn't properly supervised before death, Trump delays tariffs on China, and other headlines

click to enlarge Attorney General William Barr criticized the management of the federal jail where Jeffrey Epstein reportedly killed himself. - ERIN SCHAFF/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Attorney General William Barr criticized the management of the federal jail where Jeffrey Epstein reportedly killed himself.
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NATION:
The Trump administration announced on Aug. 12 that it would change the way the Endangered Species Act is enforced — a policy shift that would allow mining, oil and gas drilling, and development in the habitat of protected species.

IN OTHER NEWS...


Delayed economic war
Bowing to pressure from the private sector and other interest groups, the Trump administration moved to limit the swath of Chinese goods it would enact tariffs on starting Sept. 1. The full list will go into effect in December. (New York Times)

Inadequate supervision
One of the two individuals guarding Jeffrey Epstein when he reportedly hanged himself in a federal jail cell in New York was not an official correctional officer, and neither had checked on the inmate several hours before he was found. U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr has promised an inquiry into the sex offender's death. (New York Times)

Anti-lefty DA
On Aug. 12 at the Fraternal Order of Police conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, Barr defended law enforcement and slammed recently elected progressive prosecutors who “style themselves as ‘social justice’ reformers'” for being soft on crime. (Associated Press)

Rich immigrants only
In defending a federal policy change that would deny visas and green cards to immigrants if they use — or are thought to need — federal, state and local government benefits, such as food stamps, Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said that the U.S. welcomes immigrants who can "pull themselves up by their bootstraps." (NPR)


Appetite for density
The Spokane City Council expanded the geographic area in which developers can utilize the Multi-Family Tax Exemption, an effort to spur housing development in a region plagued by low vacancy rates. (Spokesman-Review)

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About The Author

Josh Kelety

As a staff writer, Josh covers criminal justice issues and Spokane County government. Previously, he worked as a reporter for Seattle Weekly. Josh grew up in Port Townsend and graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle.