McGahn defies House subpoena, Trump outspends opponents on Facebook, and other headlines

click to enlarge President Donald Trump with Donald McGahn, the White House counsel, at a swearing-in ceremony at the White House in Washington, Jan. 22, 2017. Trump ordered the firing of Robert Mueller, the special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation, in June 2017, according to four people told of the matter, ultimately backing down after McGahn threatened to resign over the directive. - AL DRAGO/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Al Drago/The New York Times
President Donald Trump with Donald McGahn, the White House counsel, at a swearing-in ceremony at the White House in Washington, Jan. 22, 2017. Trump ordered the firing of Robert Mueller, the special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation, in June 2017, according to four people told of the matter, ultimately backing down after McGahn threatened to resign over the directive.

ON INLANDER.COM

NEWS:
A pro-choice rally is slated to occur this evening in downtown Spokane in response to Alabama's recent passage of its heavily restrictive anti-abortion law — one of many similar actions happening today across the county.

NEWS: After a Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich fired a deputy for allegedly breaking state law by recording a phone conversation without consent, a third-party arbitrator has upheld the termination and shot down the deputy's grievance.


IN OTHER NEWS...

All-in on Facebook
President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election campaign has spent millions more on Facebook ads — a key component of his campaign strategy in 2016 — than any individual Democratic candidate. (New York Times)

Investigation obstruction
Former White House counsel Donald F. McGahn II skipped a congressional hearing — that he was subpoenaed to go to — at the order of the White House, infuriating House Democrats. The move has also increased the justification for possible impeachment proceedings among some Democratic officials. (New York Times)

Left behind
Washington state recently approved reforms to its tough-on-crime "three strikes" sentencing law that was passed during the 1990s, changes that are intended to ensure that repeat nonviolent offenders don't end up serving lengthy sentences alongside violent felons. However, the reform isn't retroactive, leaving a group of roughly 62 inmates — half of whom are black — stuck behind bars. (Seattle Times)


Free transit for kiddos
Spokane Public Schools students will get free bus passes this summer thanks to a $50,000 program recently approved by the City Council. The passes will be good from June through September, and can be picked up at any of the city's library branches with presentation of a student ID. (Spokesman-Review)

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About The Author

As a staff writer, Josh covers criminal justice issues and Spokane County government. Previously, he worked as a reporter for Seattle Weekly. Josh grew up in Port Townsend and graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle.