Out for Inlander Restaurant Week 2020: Hunt

click to enlarge Hunt's first course option of duck liver mousse. - CHEY SCOTT PHOTO
Chey Scott photo
Hunt's first course option of duck liver mousse.
For day eight of Inlander Restaurant Week, we checked out chef Tony Brown's new downtown basement bar and restaurant Hunt, which serves "elevated campfire cuisine." Think game meats — wild boar, rabbit, quail, etc. — and fancy s'mores, along with rustic, country-style dishes cooked over an open fire.

click to enlarge Deviled duck eggs, with bonito flakes, wild greens and a duck fat vinaigrette. - CHEY SCOTT PHOTO
Chey Scott photo
Deviled duck eggs, with bonito flakes, wild greens and a duck fat vinaigrette.
Knowing it would get busy, we headed there right after work around 5:30 pm and were able to grab two seats at the roomy bar, as all the tables were already taken. Hunt doesn't take reservations, so keep that in mind if you plan to check it out in the next two nights before IRW ends — Saturday is the last day! Hunt's menu is $33 per person, and while the portions are on the smaller side, they pack a ton of flavor and creativity, along with beautiful plating and masterful execution. (At this stage in restaurant week, a meal that doesn't leave me waddling out the door is a welcome change.)

We started things off with a couple of cocktails before placing our orders. For course one, we shared the deviled duck egg (you'll get three egg halves) the duck liver mousse. The duck eggs were creamy and flavorful, with kewpie mayo (a Japanese style made with rice vinegar versus distilled), bonito flakes, chives, wild salad greens and a duck fat vinaigrette. Our favorite of the two was the airy mousse spread, served with pickled mustard seeds, sweet preserved grapes and baguette slices. (If you've never had a pate or mousse because you struggle getting past the idea of eating creamed animal liver, I promise you won't be disappointed.)
click to enlarge These turkey tostadas were like Thanksgiving leftovers on a crispy tortilla. - CHEY SCOTT PHOTO
Chey Scott photo
These turkey tostadas were like Thanksgiving leftovers on a crispy tortilla.

click to enlarge This wild mushroom cassoulet is rustic, country-style eating at its best. - CHEY SCOTT PHOTO
Chey Scott photo
This wild mushroom cassoulet is rustic, country-style eating at its best.
For our second course, we tried the wild mushroom cassoulet and turkey tostadas. The cassoulet, with lightly pickled mushrooms of several varieties atop a bed of chewy white beans and rosemary was simple; it called to mind the type of food medieval peasants would have eaten, in a good way. My guest and I rated the turkey tostadas a step above it, however. With sweet potato, charred Brussels sprouts, burnt rosemary and a thyme butterscotch gravy, the tostadas were a mashup of Thanksgiving leftovers with Mexican fare. The toasty tortilla base was the perfect crispy vehicle for its toppings, shredded dark meat turkey and veggies drizzled with the salty, savory gravy.


click to enlarge I could eat these cookie dough bonbons every day. - CHEY SCOTT PHOTO
Chey Scott photo
I could eat these cookie dough bonbons every day.
For dessert, we picked the toasted marshmallow and cookie dough bonbons. The toasted marshmallow is more like a deconstructed s'more, consisting of a scoop of graham cracker ice cream with a marshmallow and cocoa crumbles. Without a doubt, I found my favorite IRW dessert of all so far in the cookie dough bonbons, compact spheres of decadent chocolate chip cookie dough encased in white chocolate with a chocolate Oreo-like crumble. I'm a fanatic for anything chocolate, chocolate chip, or cookie dough, and this was the best combo of all three. Chef Brown, please keep this dessert on the regular menu because it's out-of-this-world amazing!

Overall, Hunt's course options offer a concise reflection of the type of fare one can expect from the regular menu (which returns after restaurant week); a mix of the familiar and comforting; creative and adventurous.

Wine Wednesday @ The Culinary Stone

Wed., April 1, 4:30 p.m.
  • or

About The Author

Chey Scott

Chey Scott is the Inlander's food and listings editor. She compiles the weekly events calendar for the print and online editions of the Inlander, manages and edits the food section, and also writes about local arts and culture. Chey (pronounced Shay) is a lifelong Spokanite and a graduate of Washington State University...