Sneak Peek: Our vanishing privacy; Idaho’s stay-home order; brave new businesses; and Washington pride

The latest issue of the Inlander is hitting newsstands today. Find it at your local grocery store and hundreds of other locations; use this map to find a pickup point near you. You can also read through the entire print edition here.

HIGHLIGHTS
This week’s cover story is all about privacy — how it’s quickly disappearing and why the coronavirus is only complicating matters. For years, we’ve been unwitting co-conspirators. Giant companies like Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon never really wanted us to read the fine print, and so every time we’ve clicked “OK,” they’ve taken it as a license to do whatever they want. The good news: People are beginning to pay attention, to see how this power can be abused, and Washington state is taking a leading role in that effort.

• Plus, we have a look at how online education is leaving behind lots of missing kids as well as a profile of a few brave new businesses opening their doors up during a pandemic.

HITTING THE STREETS
Our staff photographer Young Kwak was in Sandpoint on Friday to document a protest against Idaho’s stay-home order. It was one of several such protests against social-distancing restrictions around the country. Check out Young’s dramatic photos here

SOURCE OF PRIDE
Meanwhile, Prakash Gatta, a MultiCare surgeon who survived COVID-19, is proud of Washington state’s coronavirus response. "Those people who died in Kirkland actually helped save a lot of lives," he says. Read Daniel Walters’ story here.

TIMES A-CHANGIN’
The MAC’S annual ArtFest is moving online, and the traditional Mother's Day Tour of Homes is canceled. More here.

LAST WORD
The coronavirus has presented a dilemma to cities and homeless shelters everywhere: How do you keep people who are homeless safe without crowding them too close in a shelter? In Coeur d'Alene, St. Vincent de Paul has an idea.

Music Finds a Way: The Spokane Symphony @ Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 10
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About The Author

Jacob H. Fries

Jacob H. Fries is the editor of the Inlander. In that position, he oversees editorial coverage of the paper and occasionally contributes his own writing. Before joining the paper, he wrote for numerous publications, including the Tampa Bay Times, the Boston Globe and the New York Times. He grew up in Spokane Valley...