White House projects COVID-19 death toll of 3,000 people per day, Washington casinos weigh reopening, and other headlines

click to enlarge President Donald Trump and members of the coronavirus task force address a news conference at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 17, 2020. - DOUG MILLS/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Doug Mills/The New York Times
President Donald Trump and members of the coronavirus task force address a news conference at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 17, 2020.
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WORLD:
Roughly two weeks after Canada's deadliest mass shooting, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau introduced an immediate ban on what he called “military-style assault weapons.”

NEWS: Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich blames a recent uptick in property crime on pandemic-related inmate releases. But other criminal justice players are skeptical that there's a connection.


NEWS: Photos from Thursday night's homeless camp police confrontation at Coeur d'Alene Park.

COVID-19

U.S. death toll
Around 67,000 people nationwide have died from COVID-19. (Johns Hopkins University)

Grim projections
While U.S. President Donald Trump has called for states to reopen their economies, his administration is privately projecting that COVID-19 cases and deaths will steadily increase as a result. By June 1, the estimated daily death toll will reach 3,000 — nearly double the current level. (New York Times)


Public health rationale
Stephen Miller, President Trump's chief advisor on immigration, has long sought to use disease as a justification to close down the country's borders. Then came COVID-19. (New York Times)

Casinos reopening
Amidst the pandemic, tribal governments across Washington are weighing when and how to reopen casinos, which are a major source of revenue and jobs. (Seattle Times)

Not a team player
Global health officials and diplomats are worried that, when a COVID-19 vaccine is found, the Trump administration's "America First" posture will result in a global vaccine brawl. (Politico)

IN OTHER NEWS...

Bloomsday but not
With Bloomsday postponed, diehard fans still took to the streets on Sunday morning. (Spokesman-Review)


Reconsidering conventions
COVID-19 has prompted Democrats and Republicans to reconsider their summer conventions. But even before that, there was debate over whether they are an outdated ritual. (New York Times)

Another crisis
The pandemic is pushing America into a mental health crisis. And the system is not set up to handle it. (Washington Post)

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About The Author

Josh Kelety

As a staff writer, Josh covers criminal justice issues and Spokane County government. Previously, he worked as a reporter for Seattle Weekly. Josh grew up in Port Townsend and graduated from the University of Washington. Message him through Signal @ (360) 301-3490.