August 14, 2017 Slideshows » News & Comment, Blog

Clashes in Charlottesville 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — The city of Charlottesville was engulfed by violence Saturday as white nationalists and counterprotesters clashed in one of the bloodiest fights to date over the removal of Confederate monuments across the South.

White nationalists had long planned a demonstration over the city’s decision to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. But the rally exploded into racial taunting, shoving and outright brawling, prompting the governor to declare a state of emergency and the National Guard to join police in clearing the area. (Via the New York Times)

Matt Eich/The New York Times
Confrontations in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., where white nationalists faced counterprotestors at a planned protest, billed as a “Unite the Right” rally, Aug. 12, 2017. The demonstration, which both organizers and critics had said was the largest gathering of white nationalists in recent years, turned violent almost immediately; a car that plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters later left at least one person dead and at least 19 injured.
Edu Bayer/The New York Times
A white nationalist carries a Nazi flag during a protest in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 12, 2017. The White House, under siege over President Trump’s initial comments, on Sunday condemned “white supremacists” for inciting violence that left a woman dead Saturday.
Edu Bayer/The New York Times
Jason Kessler, organizer for Unite the Right, a gathering of White Nationalists in Charlottesville, Va., is punched while speaking at a news conference in front of City Hall, Aug. 13, 2017, a day after the rally and counter-protests resulted in violence, injuries and a death.
Edu Bayer/The New York Times
Jason Kessler, organizer for Unite the Right, a gathering of white nationalists, is escorted away from his news conference after he was punched, at City Hall in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 13, 2017, The incident comes the day after a rally and counter-protests in the city resulted in violence, injuries and a death.
Edu Bayer/The New York Times
Parishioners pray during church service at the First Baptist Church the day after a rally by white nationalist groups and counter-protests resulted in violence, injuries and a death, in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 13, 2017. Virginia Gov.Terry McAuliffe, in an impromptu interview before addressing two church congregations on Sunday morning, said the police estimated that 80 percent of those at the white nationalists’ rally and counterprotests were armed, “yet not a shot was fired.”
Edu Bayer/The New York Times
Parishioners during church service at the First Baptist Church the day after a rally by white nationalist groups and counter-protests resulted in violence, injuries and a death, in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 13, 2017. Virginia Gov.Terry McAuliffe, in an impromptu interview before addressing two church congregations on Sunday morning, said the police estimated that 80 percent of those at the white nationalists’ rally and counterprotests were armed, “yet not a shot was fired.”
Matt Eich/The New York Times
Counterprotesters in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., where white nationalists planned a protest, billed as a “Unite the Right” rally, Aug. 12, 2017. The demonstration, which both organizers and critics had said was the largest gathering of white nationalists in recent years, turned violent almost immediately; a car that plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters later left at least one person dead and at least 19 injured.
Matt Eich/The New York Times
White nationalists in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., where they faced counterprotestors at a so-called “Unite the Right” rally, Aug. 12, 2017. The demonstration, which both organizers and critics had said was the largest gathering of white nationalists in recent years, turned violent almost immediately; a car that plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters later left at least one person dead and at least 19 injured.
Matt Eich/The New York Times
White nationalists in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., where they faced counterprotestors at a so-called “Unite the Right” rally, Aug. 12, 2017. The demonstration, which both organizers and critics had said was the largest gathering of white nationalists in recent years, turned violent almost immediately; a car that plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters later left at least one person dead and at least 19 injured.
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Matt Eich/The New York Times
Confrontations in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., where white nationalists faced counterprotestors at a planned protest, billed as a “Unite the Right” rally, Aug. 12, 2017. The demonstration, which both organizers and critics had said was the largest gathering of white nationalists in recent years, turned violent almost immediately; a car that plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters later left at least one person dead and at least 19 injured.
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