Monday, June 19, 2017

CONCERT REVIEW: Alice Cooper creeped out Airway Heights in all the best ways on Sunday night

Posted By on Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 11:00 AM

Alice Cooper headlined this season's first outdoor summer concert at Northern Quest on Sunday night. - DAN NAILEN
  • Dan Nailen
  • Alice Cooper headlined this season's first outdoor summer concert at Northern Quest on Sunday night.

I'm not going to say that Alice Cooper made a deal with the devil to still be so spry and rocking at 69 years old — as we all know by now, the man's an avowed Christian — but there's something unnatural about how much raucous fun the man still has on stage, nearly 50 years after first hitting the public eye.

Sunday night, Cooper kicked off Northern Quest's Outdoor Summer Concerts series with a setlist that leaned hard on his '70s-era classics like Welcome to My Nightmare and Billion Dollar Babies. In the process, he showed why he's considered a garage-rock pioneer, while still offering up the theatrics one has come to expect from an Alice Cooper show.

A live boa constrictor for "Welcome to My Nightmare." A Frankenstein monster for "Feed My Frankenstein." Alice in a straightjacket for "The Ballad of Dwight Fry." Alice beheaded with a guillotine just before "Killer/I Love The Dead." All the eye-candy greatest hits were there, and entertaining for sure.

Don't get too close to that walking stick, people. - DAN NAILEN
  • Dan Nailen
  • Don't get too close to that walking stick, people.
I'll admit that for years, before ever seeing Alice Cooper perform, I thought the theatrics were the ONLY reason to go to an Alice Cooper show. But that's not the case, as he emphatically proved Sunday night with a barreling performance that touched on punk, metal, blues and Tin Pan Alley balladry over the course of about 20 songs. An Alice Cooper show is inherently musical — and much more so than many of the heavy metal bands he's toured with since his '80s comeback with songs like "Poison."

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Van attack outside London mosque being treated as terrorism, court OKs offensive trademarks, and morning headlines

Posted By on Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 9:42 AM


ON INLANDER.COM


WHAT'S UP? This week's calendar brings you Hoopfest, Steel Barrel's birthday, David Sedaris and more. Check out a curated list of events for this week here.

ARTS & CULTURE: Best 25 movies of the century so far? The New York Times came up with their list, so Inlander film editor Nathan Weinbender took up the challenge and made his own. See what made the cut here.


IN OTHER NEWS 
The scene outside a London mosque where a van was driven into a group of worshipers, killing one person and injuring at least 10.
  • The scene outside a London mosque where a van was driven into a group of worshipers, killing one person and injuring at least 10.


Attack targets London mosque
The New York Times reports that UK authorities are treating a deadly van attack outside a mosque in London this morning as terrorism targeting Muslims, "amid fears of retaliation for several recent assaults in the country attributed to Islamist extremists."

Offensive or taking back terms?
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a law against registering a trademark of a disparaging term violates the First Amendment, in a case brought by the Slants, an Asian American rock group who were originally told they couldn't trademark their band name, reports the Washington Post.

What remains
Hecla Mining Company (the same company in a deadlock with miners in Mullan, Idaho, who are on strike) has started reclamation work at a mine it bought and closed in Montana two years ago, the Flathead Beacon reports.
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Sunday, June 18, 2017

THIS WEEK: Hoopfest, Summer Parkways, Steel Barrel birthday and Paul Simon

Posted By on Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 1:01 PM

Paul Simon headlines Spokane Arena on Friday.
  • Paul Simon headlines Spokane Arena on Friday.

We officially reach summer this week, and there's a bevy of entertaining activities for your consideration in our event listings and Staff Picks.

Here are some highlights of the week ahead:

Monday, June 19

LIVE BANDS | Joseph Huber brings a sparse but compelling style of Americana to the Pin! for a show on Monday. Here's a little sample:


Tuesday, June 20

FILM | The Garland Theater's summer camp series continues with a personal fave, The Lost Boys! Vampires! Kiefer! Cory and Corey! A killer soundtrack! Here's the trailer:


Wednesday, June 21

SPORTS & OUTDOORS | It's the seventh annual Summer Parkways bike ride, when several Spokane streets are closed to cars to allow easy cruising. Hop on your wheels and roll!

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Friday, June 16, 2017

The best films of the century so far? We've got some opinions about that

Posted By on Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 12:32 PM

The Royal Tenenbaums
  • The Royal Tenenbaums

Last week, New York Times film critics A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis embarked upon a fool's errand and ranked the 25 best films of the century so far. These kinds of lists always engender debate, and you probably saw someone share it on Facebook, no doubt grousing about titles that were omitted (look at the comments on the Times' original post for some of that).

But what Scott and Dargis did select was, as their writing so often is, illuminating and surprising. Their pick for No. 1: Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood. No complaints there. Also in the mix: Popular Hollywood fare (Inside Out, Mad Max: Fury Road, The 40-Year-Old Virgin), major works from prestigious American filmmakers (Clint Eastwood's Million Dollar Baby, Steven Spielberg's Munich) and a number of more obscure foreign films — China's A Touch of Sin, Romania's The Death of Mr. Lazarescu, Mexico's Silent Light.

I love exercises like this, not only because they point you in the direction of lesser-known work, but because they inspire you to mentally form your own list. Which is exactly what I did, and narrowing it down to a more digestible 10 titles was something of a feat. Here are my choices, about which you'll no doubt disagree.

Zodiac
  • Zodiac
10. Zodiac (2007)
An unshakeable sense of dread pervades every meticulous frame of David Fincher's Zodiac, which is easily one of the scariest movies of the last few decades. On its surface, it's a true crime thriller about an elusive serial killer running roughshod over 1970s San Francisco, but it's also about the elusive nature of the truth and the dangers of obsession.

9. Talk to Her (2002)
This is Spanish auteur Pedro Almodovar's masterpiece, a full-blown melodrama centered on a pair of comatose women (one's a bullfighter, the other a ballerina) and the relationship that develops between the two men who care for them. Almodovar, one of the world's greatest living filmmakers, has always trafficked in the stuff of soap operas, but his virtuosic command of style — from the music to the bold colors to the out-of-nowhere silent film interlude — is completely rapturous.

8. Pan's Labyrinth (2006)
Part fairy tale, part brutal war film, this macabre fantasy from Mexico remains the strongest statement, both visually and narratively, by visionary director Guillermo del Toro. His sense of beauty has always had a gruesome edge to it (no one excels at marrying gorgeous production design with horrifying special effects quite like he does), and that's never been more apparent than in Pan's Labyrinth, which has the uncanny ability to repulse, fascinate and enchant all at once.

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Investigating the 'wanderlust gene,' a perfect storm for allergies, and the return of Summer Parkways

Posted By on Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 11:35 AM

Summer Parkways returns to Manito and Comstock Parks on Wednesday, June 21. - YOUNG KWAK PHOTO
  • Young Kwak photo
  • Summer Parkways returns to Manito and Comstock Parks on Wednesday, June 21.

Traveling genes
Ever feel an near-unstoppable urge to hit the highway? To take that freeway exit for no good reason other than to see where it goes? A desire to explore faraway lands? That almost primal call to travel may actually be in your genes. A “wanderlust gene” — DRD4-7R — has been identified in about 20 percent of the population, and is more prominent in North and South American populations; in other words, people whose ancestors have immigrated to new lands. In a report in Conde Nast Traveler, biologist Dawn Masler notes that the wanderlust gene affects dopamine levels in the brain: “Dopamine is the 'liking' hormone, and when you want to get more, it doesn’t sate you — you get hooked.”

Taking advantage of the ever-expanding knowledge of our genetic make-up is the goal of a new form of medicine being dubbed “scientific wellness.” How does knowledge of our DNA impact the way health care is delivered now, and what does the future hold?

Read about it in the new issue of InHealth.


Gesundheit!
Our weird spring weather has created a perfect storm for allergies: tree pollens were delayed by the cool, wet spring, and are now overlapping with grass pollens. “For people who aren’t allergic, this means a gritty sensation in the eyes, nose and throat. For those who are allergic, they’ve got an intense concentration of tree and grass pollen giving them cold-like symptoms,” says Tim Kohlhauff of WSU’s extension program in Spokane. A WSU news release reports the situation may start to improve when tree pollinating ends in late June; grass pollination continues through mid-July.


Summer Parkways returns

Mark your calendar for next Wednesday’s Summer Parkways in Manito and Comstock parks, a glorious, once-a-year glorious when roads are closed to traffic and filled with bikes, skaters and other human-powered transportation. Neighbors enjoying al fresco dining on their front porches, as well as information booths lining the route, add to the festive atmosphere.
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The cost of reduced school suspensions, Amazon gobbles up Whole Foods, and other morning headlines

Posted By on Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 9:42 AM


ON INLANDER.COM

NEWS: On Twitter, a Spokane Valley councilman said that "Countries don't, and shouldn't, care for children. Parents do!" Here's what else Ed Pace said, and what he claims he meant.

NEWS:
An all-white Spokane jury acquitted a white man of manslaughter and murder charges last month for fatally shooting a black man in the back while he was walking away after a fight. The Spokane Ministers Fellowship, Spokane Community Against Racism and the Spokane branch of the NAACP are organizing a "March for Justice" tomorrow to highlight what they see as racial injustice in Spokane.


IN OTHER NEWS
SPS Superintendent Shelley Redinger has dramatically reduced suspension rates, but some teachers are frustrated about the impact on their classroom.
  • SPS Superintendent Shelley Redinger has dramatically reduced suspension rates, but some teachers are frustrated about the impact on their classroom.


Arcade smoke
Mike Fagan, a marijuana opponent, has come to the defense of a pot shop whose license was denied for being too close to an arcade. (Spokesman-Review)

Lacking discipline?
Spokane Public Schools brings down its suspension and expulsion rates, but some teachers and parents are worried that the progress has come at the cost of classroom management. (Spokesman-Review)

Think kale, but beneath layers of packing peanuts

Amazon buys Whole Foods. What's next? A newspaper? (New York Times)

Dreams live on
President Trump, despite his intense anti-immigration campaign rhetoric, decides not to deport "Dreamers" — for now. (New York Times)

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Thursday, June 15, 2017

Why a Spokane Valley city councilman says that government 'shouldn't care for children'

Posted By on Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 4:27 PM

Spokane Valley City Councilman Ed Pace doesn't believe that it's the role of government to care for needy children.
  • Spokane Valley City Councilman Ed Pace doesn't believe that it's the role of government to care for needy children.
Across the world, 1 in 5 children live in poverty, and 1 in 8 faces food insecurity. The United States ranks near the bottom among wealthier countries in caring for children, according to a report released today by UNICEF.

Locally, children face a number of obstacles both in school and at home. Thousands of students between Spokane and Spokane Valley are homeless, or have to stay with a friend or relative just to have a roof over their head at night. Kids are sometimes raised in homes where they are abused or neglected, then placed in a foster care system lacking in foster homes or adequate facilities.

But for Spokane Valley Councilman Ed Pace, these are things that government shouldn't focus on.

"Countries don't, and shouldn't, care for children. Parents do!" Pace wrote on Twitter today.


The post generated significant backlash, as far as Twitter interactions with a local government representative go. People pointed out that, in fact, many parents don't care for their children. "The greatness of a country is MEASURED by how well it cares for its children and the most vulnerable," responded one person. Others questioned the morals of Pace, who is a Lutheran pastor.

Pace has never been shy about his libertarian views, so the Inlander called him today to find out what he meant by saying countries shouldn't care for children.

Pace says he was responding to a story on National Public Radio about the study done by UNICEF that said the U.S. was low on the list of taking care of its children. When he tweeted "countries," he meant that "government" shouldn't care for children, he says.

"Parents have authority and responsibility over their children," Pace says.

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March for racial justice planned for Saturday, a month after white man acquitted in the killing of black man in East Central

Posted By on Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 2:45 PM

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION
  • Caleb Walsh illustration

It's been about a month since Edward Bushnell was acquitted of murder after he shot and killed a black man who was walking away from him in East Central. But the Spokane community is still grappling with the all-white jury's decision.

Some members say the decision to acquit a white man for shooting a black man in the back is just another example of a "criminal justice system that is broken and riddled with racial disparities," and are organizing a march in memory of 45-year-old William Poindexter, the man who was shot and killed.

In July 2015, Bushnell claimed he was trying to stop Poindexter from assaulting Poindexter's girlfriend. The two got into a fight, and as Poindexter and the woman walked away, Bushnell pulled out a gun and shot him in the back, killing him. A jury in Spokane ultimately decided that Bushnell was acting in self defense.

Three community groups — the Spokane Ministers Fellowship, Spokane Community Against Racism and the Spokane branch of the NAACP — are organizing a "March for Racial Justice" this Saturday in Poindexter's honor and to highlight other racial inequities in the criminal justice system.

"We still feel like he didn't deserve what happened to him," says Pastor Walter Kendricks, president of the Spokane Ministers Fellowship. "We're no longer asking for justice. We're demanding. We are American citizens, too. How long do we have to be subjected to this nonsense?"

The march will begin at 1 pm in Liberty Park in the East Central neighborhood after a brief song and a couple of speakers. Kendricks says the organizers are still working out the specific details in that regard.

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Did Trump obstruct justice? Personal data stolen from WSU, and other morning headlines

Posted By on Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 9:41 AM


ON INLANDER.COM

NEWS: In Washington's smallest counties, elected coroners can also be the prosecuting attorney. That means people trained as lawyers must learn how to conduct death investigations on the fly. (ICYMI: Spokane County's two medical examiners are under state investigation. Grieving families say they're ignoring evidence of murder.)

MUSIC: "The band that didn't exist" but still got an invite to play one of Europe's biggest festivals, Ex Eye, is coming to Spokane.


IN OTHER NEWS
Trump: What involvement did his presidential campaign have with Russian efforts to interfere with last year's election?
  • Trump: What involvement did his presidential campaign have with Russian efforts to interfere with last year's election?

Obstructionist-in-Chief?
Robert Mueller, the special counsel appointed to uncover any links between Russia and the U.S. election, is reportedly widening the scope of his investigation into whether President Trump obstructed justice. The investigation's three prongs, explained. (Washington Post)

GOP congressman in critical condition
Rep. Steve Scalise, shot yesterday during a congressional Republican baseball practice, remains in critical condition after undergoing surgery. Three other people were also shot by a man named James Hodgkinson, who died in a shootout with police. (CNN)

Personal data stolen in April
Social Security numbers, personal health information and other sensitive data for approximately one million people was stolen from a WSU storage facility unit in April. The data was collected by Washington State University researchers and was being kept in a locked storage unit in Olympia. (Spokesman-Review)

'Everyone has to die of something'
The head of the state's health department, Nick Lyon, along with other Michigan health officials, is facing criminal charges in the water crisis that led to the deaths and illness of people in Flint. Lyon is charged with involuntary manslaughter for "willfully disregard[ing] the deadly nature of the Legionnaires' disease outbreak," court documents say. He reportedly told investigators that "he can't save everyone," and "everyone has to die of something." (Detroit Free Press)

Louisville basketball punished for hiring prostitutes
Head coach Rick Pitino received a five-game suspension, and the entire team was slapped with four years of probation for arranging strip-tease dances and hiring prostitutes for recruits. The Cardinals may also have to forfeit their 2013 national title, as the team will vacate all wins in which ineligible players were used from 2010 to 2014. (Fox Sports)
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Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Eat less meat: Local chefs participate in James Beard "Blended Burger Project"

Posted By on Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 11:08 AM


A lot of people tend to mistake me for a vegetarian, which is understandable because I eat a fair amount of veggie burgers and meat alternatives, like tofu. I'm not a vegetarian, but I do consciously try to limit my intake of meat for many reasons.

This confession, however, doesn't mean I don't enjoy a juicy burger — which are not hard to find in this town — every now and then. But my own and America's collective love of ground beef patties comes with a cost, to our health (everything in moderation, folks) and to the environment. These concerns are paramount in the James Beard Foundation's annual Blended Burger Project, going on now, which challenges chefs across the country to blend ground meat with chopped mushrooms to make a "an incredibly delicious patty that's healthier for your guests and more sustainable for the planet."

Sample Prohibition's mushroom-blended burger through July 31.
  • Sample Prohibition's mushroom-blended burger through July 31.
The competition started on May 29, and runs through July 31. To qualify for the program, chefs must swap at least 25 percent of their burgers' animal protein with mushrooms.

Of the nearly 350 chefs across the nation who've signed up to participate in this year's Blended Burger Project, three Spokane eateries are on the list: Prohibition Gastropub in North Spokane and Remedy Kitchen and Tavern on the South Hill. Allie's Vegan Pizzeria & Cafe was a late entrant to the competition, and is offering an all-vegan burger with tempeh bacon, cashew cheese and barbecue mayo.

At Prohibition, find Chef John Leonetti's "Voot Burger," which contains a blend of shiitake, oyster and cremini mushrooms with his signature coffee-grounds-infused beef. The Voot comes with greens, feta, diced onion, tomatoes and a fontina cream sauce, and is served atop a pretzel bun.

Adding finely chopped mushrooms to a ground meat blend — whether beef, turkey, lamb, pork or something else — can heighten the rich and savory characteristics, called umami, of both the meat and the mushrooms. Subbing mushrooms for ground meats also reduces sodium, calories and fat without a major sacrifice in flavor, according to information from the national nonprofit Mushroom Council, a partner in the Blended Burger Project.

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